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I have several UIView subclasses (buttons, labels, etc.) that follow the following setup pattern. My question is, why are messages still able to be sent to the UILabel after release?

    myLabel = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:someFrame];
    [someUIView addSubview:myLabel];
    [myLabel release];

     myLabel.textAlignment = UITextAlignmentCenter;

     // other property changes to myLabel

They are "owned" by a new UIView, I suppose, but I don't understand why release doesn't destroy the original object and thereby all messages to it. I'm not making property changes through someUIView's subViews. I'm not complaining. I'm just trying to understand why.

EDIT: I should add that these are instance variables, if that makes a difference.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can still send messages to the label because the label hasn't been released yet. -addSubview: retains the objects passed in, so the object remains in memory since the view is still holding a reference and you didn't nil the myLabel pointer.

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Perfect! Thanks! How would I know when another method is going to call release implicitly? Is there some list that I should be aware of? (Other than looking at the NSObject retainCount) –  Old McStopher Dec 19 '11 at 0:49
1  
After releasing an object do not use it. –  Zaph Dec 19 '11 at 0:52
2  
The short answer is... don't worry about it. Sure, I happen to know that -addSubview: performs a retain on an object, but it's not necessary. As for retainCount, just don't bother. Seriously. It's an implementation detail that will just lead to madness. –  Mark Adams Dec 19 '11 at 0:53
    
Thanks, Mark. Could you elaborate on my response to @CocoaFu? –  Old McStopher Dec 19 '11 at 1:02
    
This answer is wrong. Once you have released an object, you shouldn't use that reference to it again. In this case, it works only by coincidence; coincidence that -addSubview: happens to retain it. Assuming myLabel is a local variable, move the release to be after the last use. Note that the static analyzer should complain about this code (and rightly so). –  bbum Dec 19 '11 at 3:48

The object is not destroyed as long as the retain count is greater than 0. In this case someUIView has retained the object.

It is really best not to access an object after releasing it. a better pattern might be:

myLabel = [[[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:someFrame] autorelease];
myLabel.textAlignment = UITextAlignmentCenter;
[someUIView addSubview:myLabel];
myLabel = nil;

Second example:

myLabel = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:someFrame];
[someUIView addSubview:myLabel];
myLabel.textAlignment = UITextAlignmentCenter;

// other property changes to myLabel

[myLabel release];
myLabel = nil;
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The only reason I have property changes after the release is because other methods in the class are changing them. I wasn't sure where else to put the release if at any given time, another method could be changing its properties. –  Old McStopher Dec 19 '11 at 0:52
    
Then release after setting the textAlignment, see my second example. A suggestion" Use ARC, it will take care of all the retains and releases. –  Zaph Dec 19 '11 at 1:10
    
If myLabel is an instance variables and other methods in your class might be changing myLabel, then every change should first release the existing value and then assign anew. However, this sounds awfully fragile, if that is really what is happening; how would you ensure that, say, the textAlignment remains consistent? –  bbum Dec 19 '11 at 3:49

Your call to -addSubview: calls -retain on the label when it receives it. At this point, you relinquish ownership (by calling -release) and only the view owns it. But it still exists until the containing view also releases it.

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Because they are probably retained before...

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That's what I thought, but upon further inspection, I see no apparent prior retains. –  Old McStopher Dec 19 '11 at 0:39
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  mah Nov 13 '12 at 0:54

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