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I'd like to create a Set of character ranges in Scala, something like A..Za..z0..9. Here's my take:

scala> ('A' to 'Z').toSet.union(('a' to 'z').toSet).union(('0' to '9').toSet)
res3: scala.collection.immutable.Set[Char] = Set(E, e, X, s, x, 8, 4, n, 9, N, j, y, T, Y, t, J, u, U, f, F, A, a, 5, m, M, I, i, v, G, 6, 1, V, q, Q, L, b, g, B, l, P, p, 0, 2, C, H, c, W, h, 7, r, K, w, R, 3, k, O, D, Z, o, z, S, d)

This can't be the idiomatic way to do this. What's a better way?

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Pablo and Paul- I appreciate your responses. You both added to this discussion. From Pablo's answer, I found my way to the (...).toSet implementation later suggested by Paul. However, because Paul's answer is technically more correct, I switched my accepted answer. I learned from both of you. Thank you. –  Reece Dec 19 '11 at 21:32
    
And, sorry to the thread for accepting an answer that I now understand was not technically correct (even if it was completely satisfactory for my needs). Obviously, I'm learning Scala. –  Reece Dec 19 '11 at 21:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

How about this:

scala> ('a' to 'z').toSet ++ ('A' to 'Z') ++ ('0' to '9')
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Set[Char] = Set(E, e, X, s, x, 8, 4, n, 9, N, j, y, T, Y, t, J, u, U, f, F, A, a, 5, m, M, I, i, v, G, 6, 1, V, q, Q, L, b, g, B, l, P, p, 0, 2, C, H, c, W, h, 7, r, K, w, R, 3, k, O, D, Z, o, z, S, d)

Or, alternatively:

scala> (('a' to 'z') ++ ('A' to 'Z') ++ ('0' to '9')).toSet
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Set[Char] = Set(E, e, X, s, x, 8, 4, n, 9, N, j, y, T, Y, t, J, u, U, f, F, A, a, 5, m, M, I, i, v, G, 6, 1, V, q, Q, L, b, g, B, l, P, p, 0, 2, C, H, c, W, h, 7, r, K, w, R, 3, k, O, D, Z, o, z, S, d)
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the first toSet is not necessary –  Pablo Fernandez Dec 19 '11 at 1:37
4  
Yes it is - otherwise you get an IndexedSeq, not a Set –  Paul Butcher Dec 19 '11 at 1:38
    
he probably doesn't care about the implementation –  Pablo Fernandez Dec 19 '11 at 1:52
    
@Pablo: You should read the title again. Also, "toSet" does not just change the implementation. –  Kim Stebel Dec 19 '11 at 4:40
    
I wasn't taking him literally when he said set, and I guess I was right since the answer was picked as the correct one. –  Pablo Fernandez Dec 19 '11 at 15:35

A more functional version of your code is this:

scala> Traversable(('A' to 'Z'), ('a' to 'z'), ('0' to '9')) map (_ toSet) reduce (_ ++ _)

Combining it with the above solutions, one gets:

scala> Seq[Seq[Char]](('A' to 'Z'), ('a' to 'z'), ('0' to '9')) reduce (_ ++ _) toSet

If you have just three sets, the other solutions are simpler, but this structure also works nicely if you have more ranges or they are given at runtime.

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('0' to 'z').filter(_.isLetterOrDigit).toSet
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1  
IMHO this is not very readable code. You have to know ASCII code to guess what ends up in the set. –  ziggystar Dec 19 '11 at 9:50
    
Why not '0' to 'z' filter(_.isLetterOrDigit) toSet –  Rex Kerr Dec 19 '11 at 14:27
    
@ziggistar: Of course this is just an optimization, you could run the range e.g. from 0 to 127. And for the other solutions you have to know ASCII as well, e.g. the assumption that the range a..z contains only letters is not true for other encodings (say EBCDIC). –  Landei Dec 19 '11 at 14:35
    
@Rex Kerr: Thanks, corrected. –  Landei Dec 19 '11 at 14:35

I guess it can't be simpler than this:

('a' to 'z') ++ ('A' to 'Z') ++ ('0' to '9')

You might guess that ('A' to 'z') will include both, but it also adds some extra undesirable characters, namely:

([, \, ], ^, _, `)

Note:

This will not return a Set but an IndexedSeq. I assumed you don't mind the implementation, but if you do, and do want a Set, just call toSet to the result.

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1  
That's not a set. It actually ends up as a Vector (typed as IndexedSeq). Also, it contains the integer values 0 through 9 not the characters. –  Rex Kerr Dec 19 '11 at 3:56
    
Isn't it funny that you're downvoting the question as "not useful" when the OP has marked it as accepted? –  Pablo Fernandez Dec 19 '11 at 14:03
3  
The answer is wrong, whether or not the OP recognizes it. Since StackOverflow is designed to be a reference for other people with the same question, it makes sense to vote based on whether the question is answered not whether the original asker is happy. –  Rex Kerr Dec 19 '11 at 14:24
    
The answer is not wrong, it's just incomplete. I've added a note now, please reconsider the downvote –  Pablo Fernandez Dec 19 '11 at 15:33
1  
Now that you have fixed 0 to 9, it is not actually wrong, just incomplete, which does change my mind (to neutral). –  Rex Kerr Dec 19 '11 at 19:49

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