Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi guys : I have a builder class, which should only be used once. For example, there is a "setup" constructor, and then a "to..." method which specifies the type of object to be built.

For example

AnimalBuilder a = new AnimalBuilder("myTiger");

Animal tiger = a.toTiger(4);
//or 
Animal dog = a.toDog(4) ; 

etc.....

However, I don't want the Builder to ever be reused, and since it maintains state internally (i.e. unlike a factory, builders are two step process).

Thus, I'm currently wrapping each "toXXX" method by a precondition - that checks a true/false bit, which records wether or not the Builder has been completed. If so, then an IllegalStateException is then thrown.

A possible critique of this approach : Why am I using a builder (rather than a factory?) .... Because construction of these objects is much more modularized and easily understood using a two-step builder process - I don't want to copy the generic (first step) input args into all the specific methods.

1) Is there a simpler way to ensure that a builder class is used only once ? Im thinking maybe there is a Factory/Builder library out there which might make construction of these design patterns with less required boiler plate.

2) Is there a better way to implement a two-step object builder design pattern which is evading me at the moment ?

share|improve this question
1  
Why would you want for the builder to be used only once? –  denis.solonenko Dec 19 '11 at 2:54

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure that you're going about using the Builder pattern correctly as you shouldn't have heaps of boilerplate code checking for the state. I'm also not sure why you would only want the builder to be used once, it seems counter-intuitive to me; but none the less - you shouldn't have to have lots of boilerplate code to stop the builder being used once if you set up the classes appropriately. For example:

public class CarBuilder {
    //builder class
    String make;
    String model;
    String colour;
    boolean isUsed = false;

    public Car build() {
        if (isUsed) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("Builder already used!");
        }

        isUsed = true;
        return new Car(this);
    }

    public String getMake() {
        return make;
    }

    public String getModel() {
        return model;
    }

    public String getColour() {
        return colour;
    }

    public CarBuilder setMake(String make) {
        this.make = make;
        return this;
    }

    public CarBuilder setModel(String model) {
        this.model = model;
        return this;
    }

    public CarBuilder setColour(String colour) {
        this.colour = colour;
        return this;
    }
}

public class Car {
    //director class

    private final String make;
    private final String model;
    private final String colour;

    Car(CarBuilder theBuilder) {
        make = theBuilder.getMake();
        model = theBuilder.getModel();
        colour = theBuilder.getColour();
    }

    public String getMake() {
        return make;
    }

    public String getModel() {
        return model;
    }

    public String getColour() {
        return colour;
    }
}

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        CarBuilder subaruBuilder = new CarBuilder();
        subaruBuilder.setColour("Blue");
        subaruBuilder.setMake("Subaru");
        subaruBuilder.setModel("Impreza");
        Car subaruImpreza = subaruBuilder.build();
    }
}

Using the above example, CarBuilder can only be used once as the build method has the check on it. I purposely didn't put the check on all of the set methods, as if this is the pattern of development that you are going to use then the developers in your area (or you, if you're solo) will know it and will not use them multiple times. Even if you do, when you try to build it will throw you the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
This is 'sort of' a solutoin, but its not specific to my problem...In your solution, you have used a single-step "builder", but you have not demonstrated a TWO step build. For example : First I want to set up the build for a generic car with generic args. Then I want to actually BUILD a subaru car, and that method will have specific args - that are SPECIFIC to a subaru. Nevertheless, +1 for exemplifying a 1-step build that only requires a single IllegalStateException error. –  jayunit100 Dec 19 '11 at 16:08
    
What I have shown above is the builder pattern. I'm not sure I fully understand your requirements to have a "two step" build process for an object. I'm not sure why you would setup a generic car with generic args first and then use that object to "cast" it to a concrete object with args specific to the object you were trying to create in the first place. Can you give a specific use case if possible please? –  Deco Dec 19 '11 at 17:24
    
Well.. Imagine that you would have 10 arguments required for creating a car, some of which had the same type (i.e. you might have 4 integers for number of seats, horsepower, and maximum speed). HAving several ints of the same type can confuse a factory class. Thus, a two step builder is more readable - you build the base type, and then build the custom type after wards . That way, you reduce the amount of args per method. Another way to do this is create an object (i.e. a bean) that is built incrementally. –  jayunit100 Jan 11 '12 at 0:07

Force the user of your builder to choose one or the other implementation during construction. Use the Step builder pattern for this kind of problems.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.