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Given these code

var Person = function(firstName, lastName) {
  this.firstName = firstName;
  this.lastName = lastName;
};

Person.prototype = {
  toString: function() { return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName; }
};

var test4 = Object.create(Person);
test4.firstName = "Phat4";
test4.lastName = "Wang4";
console.log(test4.toString === Object.toString); // true
console.log(test4.toString === Function.toString); // true

var test5 = { firstName: "Phat5", lastName: "Wang5" };
console.log(test5.toString === test4.toString); // false
console.log(test4.toString === Function.toString); // true
console.log(test5.toString === Object.prototype.toString); // true

console.log(test5.toString()); // [object Object]
console.log(test4.toString()); // Function.prototype.toString called on incompatible object

Why does the last line console.log(test4.toString()) throws error ? It shows that test4.toString is not like test5.toString but I don't get it ..

Ps. I've tried searching the threads and still cannot answer myself. Sorry if this duplicates with any.

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node.js? or in a browser? –  chakrit Dec 19 '11 at 4:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of this:

var test4 = Object.create(Person);

You should be doing:

var test4 = Object.create(Person.prototype);

The way you had it, test4 had the Person function in its prototype chain, not the intended prototype object that has your toString method.

Because of this, it was using a toString() method that is apparently anticipating being called against a Function object.

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So that mean test4.toString() is Function.toString() which overrides toString() method inherited from Object, right ? –  Phat Wangrungarun Dec 19 '11 at 6:32
    
@PhatWangrungarun: Yes, it overrides the Object.prototype.toString method, which is the generic one. –  RightSaidFred Dec 19 '11 at 6:46
    
Get it now, thanks! –  Phat Wangrungarun Dec 19 '11 at 6:53

There is a difference between assigning to a prototype and assigning a new property to the prototype of an object.

You declared a function Person as a constructor function, but then you are pretty much assigning something to its prototype by doing this:

Person.prototype = {
  toString: function() { return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName; }
};

That means you assigning a new object key value pair toString-function to Person.prototype, instead of actually adding a new property to it, in which you should have done like this:

Person.prototype.toString = function() { return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName; }

What entails from this is that when you are actually creating a new object that inherits from Person object by calling Object.create, then what happens in its implementation is a new object will be freshly created, and then it will return that new object which will override the prototype property that javascript assumed you have created by doing that Person.prototype assignment previously earlier in your code.

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var Person = function(firstName, lastName) { 
    this.firstName = firstName; 
    this.lastName = lastName;
  }; var p1=new Person("Phat1","Wang1");

p1 is an Object

var p2= Object.create(Person);
p2.firstName="Phat2";
p2.lastName="Wang2";

p2 is a function

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