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I'm trying to add copyright to an image. If the resolution of image is less than 4592x2576, it works as I want. But in second case (in this case if the resolution is equals 4592x2576) it adds copyright too big size.

Look attachments for details.

class Program
{
    private static string file5 = "d:\\DSC01305.JPG";
    private static string file6 = "d:\\DSC01427.JPG";

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        AddCopyrightWithText(file5);//good
        AddCopyrightWithText(file6);//not good
    }

    private const string CopyrightText = "mysite.com";
    private const int MaxFontSize = 190;
    const int coefficient = 20;

    public static void AddCopyrightWithText(string fileName)
    {
        using (var img = Image.FromFile(fileName))
        {
            using (var gr = Graphics.FromImage(img))
            {
                var color = Color.FromArgb(90, 241, 235, 105);
                int fontSize = img.Width / coefficient;
                if (fontSize > MaxFontSize)
                    fontSize = MaxFontSize;

                var font = new Font("Comic Sans MS", (float)fontSize, FontStyle.Bold);

                var stringFormat = new StringFormat();
                stringFormat.Alignment = StringAlignment.Center;
                stringFormat.LineAlignment = StringAlignment.Center;

                gr.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.AntiAlias;
                int y = img.Height - (int)gr.MeasureString(CopyrightText, font, int.MaxValue).Height;
                int x = img.Width / 2;

                gr.DrawString(CopyrightText, font, new SolidBrush(color), new Point(x, y), stringFormat);
            }
            using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
            {
                img.Save(ms, ImageFormat.Jpeg);
                img.Dispose();
                File.Delete(fileName);
                var file = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write);
                ms.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
                ms.WriteTo(file);
                file.Close();
                file.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }
}

In the second case if I set fontSize = 182 manually (becase in the first case fontSize is equals 182), there is no effect, the result is the same!

How do I fix it?

P.S. First and second attachments show the result I want, third and fourth shows the bug. Pay attention in third attachment I changed the fontSize manually from 190 to 182.

Original image below good result

Original image below good result

Original image below bad result

Original image below bad result

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1  
Did you try different fonts? Perhaps it is the font that is messing things up. –  Erno de Weerd Dec 19 '11 at 8:42
1  
Try to draw the string using the TextRenderer class (MeasureText/DrawText methods). It does GDI rendering (opposed to GDI+ rendering in Graphics.DrawString), and it usually returns more consistent results. Method overloads are slightly different, but you should be able to modify that part easily. –  Groo Dec 19 '11 at 9:02
    
@Groo, these methods need the assembly System.Windows.Forms. Is it possible in asp.net? –  Alexandre Dec 19 '11 at 9:13
    
@AlexMaslakov: It seems that you've found the answer already so never mind. I didn't realize it's a web app, but you would nevertheless just need to add a reference to the System.Windows.Forms assembly and that's it. But since the problem was with the Font, it would probably not solve your issue anyway. –  Groo Dec 19 '11 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's necessary to use GraphicsUnit.Pixel

var font = new Font("Comic Sans MS", (float)fontSize, FontStyle.Bold, GraphicsUnit.Pixel);

The reason is, the constructor for Font that doesn't take a GraphicsUnit parameter, will use GraphicsUnit.Point.

This relates to the DPI information which for some image formats is stored in the image (for others it uses defaults from the system). Points are relative to inches, so different DPIs for the image means different sizes in pixels. Therefore different images end up having the text in different sizes. This would be wonderful if we wanted to print the images according to their DPI information and have the same size text in each printout. For on-screen use to be consistent, it's pixel-sizes that are important, so we make that explicit.

share|improve this answer
    
If you're going to answer your own question could you say why this worked, so that someone with a similar but not identical problem can figure it out rather than have a "works by magic" answer that doesn't translate directly to their case? –  Jon Hanna Dec 19 '11 at 11:58
    
No, I can not.. –  Alexandre Dec 19 '11 at 13:00
1  
Added it. Didn't want to do so if you could have done it yourself in your own words. –  Jon Hanna Dec 19 '11 at 13:28

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