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I want to get visualized statistics from my data in mongodb using matplotlib, but the way I'm using now is really weird.

I queried the mongodb 30 times for getting day-by-day data, which is already slow and dirty, especially when I'm getting the result from somewhere else instead of on the server. I wonder if there is a better/clean way to get hour-by-hour, day-by-day, month-by-month and year-by-year statistics?

Here is some code I'm using now(get day-by-day statistics):

from datetime import datetime, date, time, timedelta
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker as ticker
from my_conn import my_mongodb

t1 = []
t2 = []
today = datetime.combine(date.today(), time())
with my_mongodb() as m:
    for i in range(30):
        day = today - timedelta(days = i)
        t1 = [m.data.find({"time": {"$gte": day, "$lt": day + timedelta(days = 1)}}).count()] + t1
        t2 = [m.data.find({"deleted": 0, "time": {"$gte": day, "$lt": day + timedelta(days = 1)}}).count()] + t2

x = range(30)
N = len(x)

def format_date(x, pos=None):
    day = today - timedelta(days = (N - x - 1))
    return day.strftime('%m/%d')

plt.bar(range(len(t1)), t1, align='center', color="#4788d2") #All
plt.bar(range(len(t2)), t2, align='center', color="#0c3688") #Not-deleted

plt.xticks(range(len(x)), [format_date(i) for i in x], size='small', rotation=30)
plt.grid(axis = "y")

plt.show()
share|improve this question
    
is it virtualized statistics or visualized statistics ? – Samyak Bhuta Dec 19 '11 at 9:17
    
visualized, sorry for my poor English :-P – Felix Yan Dec 19 '11 at 9:23
    
Why don't you just query Mongo for the data over the last 30 days, sort it by date and then use Python to split it into day sized pieces? Also, how can running a query only 30 times be slow, how many results are those queries returning? Also, did you create an index on that time field? – Blubber Dec 19 '11 at 10:57
1  
What about using MapReduce to offload some of the processing to the server itself? – Blubber Dec 19 '11 at 11:05
1  
It might be worth learning a little JS. MapReduce might be well suited for this task, running it on the server means that the processing is done much closer to the data, which will translate to better performance if you are fetching large amounts of data. Anyway, good luck with it :). – Blubber Dec 19 '11 at 11:43

UPDATE:

I fundamentally misunderstood the problem. Felix was querying mongoDB to figure out how many items fell into each range; therefore, my approach didn't work, because I was trying to ask mongoDB for the items. Felix has a lot of data, so this is completely unreasonable.

Felix, here's an updated function which should do what you want:

def getDataFromLast(num, quantum):
    m = my_mongodb()
    all = []
    not_deleted = []
    today = datetime.combine(date.today(), time())
    for i in range(num+1)[-1]: # start from oldest
        day = today - i*quantum
        time_query = {"$gte":day, "$lt": day+quantum}
        all.extend(m.data.find({"time":time_query}).count())
        not_deleted.extend(m.data.find({"deleted":0, "time":time_query}).count())
    return all, not_deleted

Quantum is the "step" to look back by. For instance, if we wanted to look at the last 12 hours, I'd set quantum = timedelta(hours=1) and num = 12. An updated example usage where we get the last 30 days would be:

from datetime import datetime, date, time, timedelta
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker as ticker
from my_conn import my_mongodb

#def getDataFromLast(num, quantum) as defined above

def format_date(x, N, pos=None):
    """ This is your format_date function. It now takes N
        (I still don't really understand what it is, though)
        as an argument instead of assuming that it's a global."""
    day = date.today() - timedelta(days=N-x-1)
    return day.strftime('%m%d')

def plotBar(data, color):
    plt.bar(range(len(data)), data, align='center', color=color)


N = 30 # define the range that we want to look at

all, valid = getDataFromLast(N, timedelta(days=1)) # get the data

plotBar(all, "#4788d2") # plot both deleted and non-deleted data
plotBar(valid, "#0c3688") # plot only the valid data

plt.xticks(range(N), [format_date(i) for i in range(N)], size='small', rotation=30)
plt.grid(axis="y")
plt.show()  

Original:

Alright, this is my attempt at refactoring for you. Blubber has suggested learning JS and MapReduce. There's no need as long as you follow his other suggestions: create an index on the time field, and reduce the number of queries. This is my best attempt at that, along with a slight refactoring. I have a bunch of questions and comments though.

Starting in:

with my_mongodb() as m:
    for i in range(30):
        day = today - timedelta(days = i)
        t1 = [m.data.find({"time": {"$gte": day, "$lt": day + timedelta(days = 1)}}).count()] + t1
        t2 = [m.data.find({"deleted": 0, "time": {"$gte": day, "$lt": day + timedelta(days = 1)}}).count()] + t2

You're making a mongoDB request to find all the data from each day from the past 30 days. Why don't you just use one request? And once you have all of the data, why not just filter out the deleted data?

with my_mongodb() as m:
    today = date.today() # not sure why you were combining this with time(). It's the datetime representation of the current time.time()

    start_date = today -timedelta(days=30)
    t1 = m.find({"time": {"$gte":start_date}}) # all data since start_date (30 days ago)
    t2 = filter(lambda x: x['deleted'] == 0, all_data) # all data since start_date that isn't deleted

I'm really not sure why you were making 60 requests (30 * 2, one for all the data, one for non-deleted). Is there any particular reason you built up the data day-by-day?

Then, you have:

x = range(30)
N = len(x)

Why not:

N = 30
x = range(N)

len(range(x) is equal to x, but takes up time to compute. The way you wrote it originally is just a little... weird.

Here's my crack at it, with the changes I've suggested made in a way that is as general as possible.

from datetime import datetime, date, time, timedelta
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker as ticker
from my_conn import my_mongodb

def getDataFromLast(delta):
    """ Delta is a timedelta for however long ago you want to look
        back. For instance, to find everything within the last month,
        delta should = timedelta(days=30). Last hour? timedelta(hours=1)."""
    m = my_mongodb() # what exactly is this? hopefully I'm using it correctly.
    today = date.today() # was there a reason you didn't use this originally?
    start_date = today - delta
    all_data = m.data.find({"time": {"$gte": start_date}})
    valid_data = filter(lambda x: x['deleted'] == 0, all) # all data that isn't deleted
    return all_data, valid_data

def format_date(x, N, pos=None):
    """ This is your format_date function. It now takes N
        (I still don't really understand what it is, though)
        as an argument instead of assuming that it's a global."""
    day = date.today() - timedelta(days=N-x-1)
    return day.strftime('%m%d')

def plotBar(data, color):
    plt.bar(range(len(data)), data, align='center', color=color)

N = 30 # define the range that we want to look at
all, valid = getDataFromLast(timedelta(days=N))
plotBar(all, "#4788d2") # plot both deleted and non-deleted data
plotBar(valid, "#0c3688") # plot only the valid data

plt.xticks(range(N), [format_date(i) for i in range(N)], size='small', rotation=30)
plt.grid(axis="y")
plt.show()  
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, MANY THANKS first. For the datetime.combine thing, I used to fetch data from MySQL this way since a date.today() will make things weird, so it's a bad practice anyway when with pymongo. But, data set can be a bit too large, so fetching them all then split using python is not a good idea, as the transfer from server to me can take lots of time and then lots of time again for python iteration, as I mentioned in one of the comments in the question. – Felix Yan Dec 19 '11 at 14:58
    
Oh, is date.today() weird because it's a local date? I'm sorry, I hadn't realized that! Still, could you not try using datetime.utcnow()? – Peter Downs Dec 19 '11 at 15:03
    
When you say that the data set is too large to transfer from the server and then split/filter using python: you're already transferring all of the data from the server (this is how you fill t1 with all of the data from the past range). Is filtering that using Python really slower than re-transferring a lot of data? How much of your data is deleted? – Peter Downs Dec 19 '11 at 15:06
    
That would return the date INCLUDING the TIME, so the data slicing will fail. I tried many ways and find datetime.combine(date.today(), time()) is the most simple one, a datetime.time() is not the same as a time.time(), as the previous one returns 00:00:00 so that I can use it slicing datetimes, while the other one returns a POSIX timestamps which is of no use. – Felix Yan Dec 19 '11 at 15:08
    
OK, I'm not sure how you store timestamps in your database but you're definitely more familiar with it than me :) If your combine works, I guess there's no reason to change it! – Peter Downs Dec 19 '11 at 15:09
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to @Blubber, I've now found a way that is better to handle this purpose using Map/Reduce.

The fetching data part has been re-written to:

from dateutil import parser
parse_time = lambda s: parser.parse(s, ignoretz = True)

func_map = """
function() {
    if (this.hasOwnProperty("time"))
        emit(this.time.getUTCFullYear() + "/" + (this.time.getUTCMonth() + 1) + "/" + this.time.getUTCDate(),
        {
            count: 1,
            not_deleted: (1 - this.deleted)
        });
}
"""

func_reduce = """
function(key, values) {
    var result = {count: 0, not_deleted: 0};

    values.forEach(function(value) {
        result.count += value.count;
        result.not_deleted += value.not_deleted;
    });

    return result;
}
"""

with my_mongo() as m:
    result = m.data.inline_map_reduce(func_map, func_reduce)
    dataset = {parse_time(day['_id']): day['value']['not_deleted'] for day in result}
    dataset2 = {parse_time(day['_id']): day['value']['count'] for day in result}

Since I'm quite new to JS, there must be some way better to write those JS functions :)

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