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The program’s code is like below:

using System.Diagnostics;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        using (Process p = Process.Start("notepad.exe"))
        {
        }
    }
}

The problem is when this program has been closed and the Notepad is still running, the Notepad will lock it. And I don't want to close the Notepad.
I tried to use Unlocker to detect the problem.
The result screen shot is like below:

Result Image Link

So what I want is starting a exe file and dispose all thread resources immediately. Or I can't uninstall my program until all the program opened by it are closed. That may cause unpleasant user experience. Requiring system restart is also unpleasant. Unlocker can do it nicely. If I use Unlocker to unlock the parent folder, it won't close the Notepad, and then I can delete this program file normally.

share|improve this question
4  
Why are you calling Dispose on an object that's wrapped in a using statement? – Darin Dimitrov Dec 19 '11 at 10:29
1  
Locks what? what are you trying to do? – Shai Dec 19 '11 at 10:29
1  
First, using statement itself will call dispose on its exit. Second you may want to use WaitForExit. – Rolice Dec 19 '11 at 10:50
    
I believe this is VS debugger that causes a lock (on what, I wonder). Notepad doesn't lock anything, doesn't even keep the file opened. – GSerg Dec 19 '11 at 11:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that you never close the running process, so it continues to run, which causes Unlocker to indicate that it is locked.

I know you think you did, because you called p.Close(), but the trick is that the Process.Close() method does not cause the process to close. It does not send a WM_CLOSE or WM_QUIT message to the Notepad window. All it does is free the resources associated with the process.

Instead, you need to use the Process.CloseMainWindow() method. This will send the window a WM_CLOSE message, causing it to close properly.

So update your code to look like this (as someone else mentioned, there's no need to explicitly call Dispose if you've already wrapped the object creation in a using statement):

using System.Diagnostics;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        using (Process p = Process.Start("notepad.exe"))
        {
            p.CloseMainWindow();
            p.Close();
        }
    }
}

Note that you could use the Process.Kill() method, but this is like turning off your computer by ripping the power cord out of the wall. Instead of asking the application to close nicely, it forces it to terminate, just like clicking "End Task" in Task Manager. It should therefore be used only when the process is locked up or otherwise not responding to polite requests to close.


Also, as Rolice mentioned in a comment, the above code isn't going to be very useful. You're just starting Notepad and then immediately closing it.

Instead, you probably want to start the process, allow the user to interact with it, and then clean up after they're done with it.

In that case, you need to use the Process.WaitForExit() method. This method will block the calling thread, waiting indefinitely for the process to exit. When the user finally closes Notepad, control will return to your application's thread and you can call p.Close().

For example:

using System.Diagnostics;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        using (Process p = Process.Start("notepad.exe"))
        {
            p.WaitForExit();
            p.Close();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. The problem came from a self updating promgram. I want to delete my program file which may open some other programs before. – Yad Smood Dec 19 '11 at 12:04

There are two possible solutions here

  1. In your application, wait for the process to exit before you exit your app. There are several ways to do this.
  2. Terminate the process when your application exits. Either nicely or by force The latter is not very nice and may cause loss of data if the user was editing something.

In case #1 above you could pop up a dialog or something to the user informing that you are waiting for notepad to quit (perhaps with a button to kill it)

share|improve this answer

Try just starting the process without getting reference to it:

Process.Start("notepad.exe");
share|improve this answer
2  
This answer is wrong and harmful. There is no determined destruction. – GSerg Dec 19 '11 at 10:42
    
Did you read the question? – Cody Gray Dec 19 '11 at 11:09

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