Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question has been bugging me for a while

Is it usual to have a piece of code that works like this:

bool failed = false;
if (ptr)
{
    if (ptr->value == foo)
    {
        print("error");
        failed = true;
    }
}
if (!failed)
{
    print("all systems go");
}

Or can it be done with out the bool? I guess the first two ifs could be on one line but im not sure what order they are checked in different environments and I think it might make it harder to read.

share|improve this question
1  
What is the context? For one, you could replace the first two ifs with if (ptr && ptr->value == foo). But the definitive code will depend on the rest of the code which is not shown. –  fge Dec 19 '11 at 11:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

All compilers should follow the same precedence order, so the check can be replace by this:

if (ptr && ptr->value == foo)
{
    print("error");
    failed = true;
}

If the first part (the lone ptr) is false, then the rest of the expression will not be evaluated. This is called short-circuiting.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! and thanks for the link that i should have just googled –  richy Dec 19 '11 at 23:24

You can always rely on boolean operators short-circuiting:

const bool failed = (ptr != NULL) && (ptr->value == foo);

This will not evaluate the second part if the first (ptr != NULL) evaluates to false.

share|improve this answer

You can write your condition like this :

if (ptr && ptr->value == foo)
{
    print("error");
}
else
{
    print("all systems go");
}

In C++, conditions are evaluated lazily. As soon as final result is known, the evaluation stops. So for OR, the first true stops the evaluation, for a AND, the first false ends the evaluation

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't really have anything to do with conditions. Short-circuiting is a property of the boolean operators. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 19 '11 at 11:09
    
Thanks for being more precise than I am ;-) –  crazyjul Dec 19 '11 at 11:10
    
You're welcome ;) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 19 '11 at 11:11

In this case, you can certainly do this:

if (ptr && (ptr->value == foo) )
{
    print("error");
}
 else
{
    print("all systems go");
}

You are guaranteed that logical AND and logical OR are evaluated from left to right and that evaluation will stop when the result is known. So this is safe.

share|improve this answer

If you don't need you failed boolean later on, that code does exactly the same.

if (ptr && ptr->value == foo) {
    print("error");
} else {
    print("all systems go");
}

The order of the checks in the if-statement is well-defined and the &&-operator skips the second comparison ptr->value=foo if the first expression is not true.

share|improve this answer

you can just write if(ptr && ptr->value == foo')

C ensures, that if first condition will fail, second condition will not be checked at all. It is because FALSE & ANYTHING == FALSE.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.