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I created the following Lexer using ANTLRWorks. ( See also http://bkiers.blogspot.com/2011/03/2-introduction-to-antlr.html#intro )

 // CSVLexer.g
 lexer grammar CSVLexer;

 @lexer::header {
   package graphica.parsers;
 }

 Comma   
   :  ','  
   ;  

 LineBreak  
  :  '\r'? '\n'  
  |  '\r'  
  ;  

 SimpleValue  
   :  ~(',' | '\r' | '\n' | '"')+  
   ;  

 QuotedValue  
   :  '"' ('""' | ~'"')* '"'  
   ;  

I used the following Java class to test the Lexer.

 /**
  *
  * @author Nilo
  */
 import org.antlr.runtime.*;

 public class CSVLexerTest {

 public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    // the input source  
    String source =
            "val1, value2, value3, value3.2" + "\n"
            + "\"line\nbreak\",ABAbb,end";

    // create an instance of the lexer  
    CSVLexer lexer = new CSVLexer(new ANTLRStringStream(source));
    // wrap a token-stream around the lexer  
    CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lexer);


    // traverse the tokens and print them to see if the correct tokens are created
    // tokens.toString();
    int n = 1;
    for (Object o : tokens.getTokens()) {
        CommonToken token = (CommonToken) o;
        System.out.println("token(" + n + ") = " + token.getText().replace("\n",    "\\n"));
        n++;
    }
 }
 }

The class above ( from the same tutorial ) does NOT produce any output. If I however insert a tokens.toString() prior to the token loop then output is printed as expected.

Note: I use ANTLWorks 1.4.3, ANTLR 3.4, on Windows 7 with JDK 1.7/64bit

QUESTION: I don't understand this. Please explain. There should be a way to get this working without the tokens.toString()

share|improve this question
    
There has been a change since ANTLR 3.2 (it works with ANTLR 3.2). See the comments in next part of the tutorial: bkiers.blogspot.com/2011/03/3-lexical-analysis-of-tl.html If/when I find what has changed, I'll post it here (don't hold your breath though! :)). –  Bart Kiers Dec 19 '11 at 12:53
    
@BartKiers - It works with the workaround; but that doesn't feel good. Thanks for the tutorial, it is the best. ( And I have both books of Terence Parr ) –  ndroock1 Dec 19 '11 at 13:03
1  
I fully agree that it doesn't feel right. That's why I want to delve into the source to see why this happens since 3.3 and upwards. But there's always something more important when I have a couple of free hours... :). As I said, whenever I find out, I'll report back here. And thank you for your kind words! –  Bart Kiers Dec 19 '11 at 13:18
    
Of course, I couldn't let it rest! :) See my answer. –  Bart Kiers Dec 19 '11 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

CommonTokenStream extends BufferedTokenStream which has a List<Token> tokens that is returned when one calls getTokens(). But this List<Token> tokens only gets filled at certain times. In 3.3 and 3.4 it does not happen after getTokens() where 3.2 does fill the tokens list.

ANTLR 3.2 (and before)

public List getTokens() {
    if ( p == -1 ) {
        fillBuffer();
    }
    return tokens;
}

protected void fillBuffer() {
    // fill `tokens`
}

ANTLR 3.3 (and after)

public List getTokens() { 
    return tokens; 
}

public void fill() {
    // fill `tokens`
}

Notice how 3.2's fill method is protected and in 3.3+ it is public, so the following works:

import org.antlr.runtime.*;

public class CSVLexerTest {

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    // the input source  
    String source =
        "val1, value2, value3, value3.2" + "\n" + 
        "\"line\nbreak\",ABAbb,end";

    // create an instance of the lexer  
    CSVLexer lexer = new CSVLexer(new ANTLRStringStream(source));

    // wrap a token-stream around the lexer and fill the tokens-list 
    CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lexer);
    tokens.fill();

    // traverse the tokens and print them to see if the correct tokens are created
    // tokens.toString();
    int n = 1;
    for (Object o : tokens.getTokens()) {
      CommonToken token = (CommonToken) o;
      System.out.println("token(" + n + ") = " + token.getText().replace("\n",    "\\n"));
      n++;
    }
  }
}

producing the output:

token(1) = val1
token(2) = ,
token(3) =  value2
token(4) = ,
token(5) =  value3
token(6) = ,
token(7) =  value3.2
token(8) = \n
token(9) = "line\nbreak"
token(10) = ,
token(11) = ABAbb
token(12) = ,
token(13) = end
token(14) = <EOF>
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