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I'm writing a brainfuck interpreter in C, and I'm having a little bit of trouble with the use of somethings I'm not used to. In brainfuck, a comma ( ,) is essentially getchar(). So I have the following code:

//This is just ptr
static char *ptr;

switch (command)
{
  case ',':
    *ptr=getchar(); // Here's the code causing error
    break;
}

gcc throws error: a label can only be part of a statement and a declaration is not a statement at me when I try to compile this.

Any ideas? (Sorry about this, not so familiar with this error)

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closed as not a real question by unwind, Steve Jessop, Mark, Jens Gustedt, Andrew Barber Dec 20 '11 at 1:26

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
is it inside of a switch statement? –  Constantinius Dec 19 '11 at 11:38
    
Show more of you code; and perhaps add a semi-colon ; at the line in error. –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 19 '11 at 11:40
    
Yes it's in a switch, I suppose I left that out. –  MadPumpkin Dec 19 '11 at 11:43
    
Please post complete minimal example. This code has no errors. –  Alexandre C. Dec 19 '11 at 11:55
1  
Check this: stackoverflow.com/questions/92396/… –  Karthik Dec 19 '11 at 11:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I believe you mean

*ptr = getchar();

instead of

ptr*=getchar();

Because *= means multiply the value on the left side with the value on the right side and assign this to the left value. However, you want to dereference ptr and write the result of getchar to that location.


Other than that your code compiles perfectly fine with my version of gcc (if I declare command somewhere), so you are obviously not showing us a complete example.

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Yes, my mistake, I fixed it in my code just now as well. It shows the same error. –  MadPumpkin Dec 19 '11 at 11:46
    
ptr*=getchar() would give a different error: error: invalid operands to binary * (have char * and int) Not the one in the question. –  Karthik Dec 19 '11 at 11:46
    
@Karthik: Good point. But they may have been related. Otherwise, I cannot see an error in the presented code. –  bitmask Dec 19 '11 at 11:49
    
Terribly sorry for the waste of time. –  MadPumpkin Dec 19 '11 at 11:52

This was my mistake entirely, I had previously commented out the code before it. I thought that this was the code causing the error due to me commenting out both codes at the same time, and it not causing this error. However I tried to comment out both, and now I understand why.

It was something about FILE and using my seek in a different case.

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