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I have the following code:

package application;

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class Application {

       public String name = "Brad" ;

       public static void main ( String [ ] args ) {
              Timer time = new Timer ( );
              time.schedule ( new TimerTask ( ) {
                     @Override
                     public void run ( ) {
                            System.out.println( "Name: " ) ;
                     }
              }, 0, 10000 );

       }

}

how can I access methods and / or properties of the class within run () function? honestly, I do not know how I can have access to the context .. and no idea how to pass the object as parameter, as in PHP

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you cannot even access name within main at all, not just inside the closure –  newacct Dec 20 '11 at 3:29
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can access instance variables but in your case you can not access name since it is not static. If you want to use field variables, then you need to declare them as final in order to be able to use them inside an anonymous class.

Example:

package application; 

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

public class Application {
  public static String name = "Brad" ;

  public static void main ( String [ ] args ) {
    final String lastName = "Brad's last name";

    Timer time = new Timer ( );
    time.schedule ( new TimerTask ( ) {
      @Override
      public void run ( ) {
        System.out.println( "Name: " + name + " " + lastName ) ;
      }
    }, 0, 10000 );
  }
}
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right, and how do I access the variable? I define it as final Application, and access using this.name? –  user862010 Dec 19 '11 at 12:05
    
Like public final String name = "Brad". The reason is, that otherwise you could reassign to the variable name another object, but the inner class would have a name to the old object. The language designers did not want that. –  Joop Eggen Dec 19 '11 at 12:05
    
You have access to Application.this in general, like Application.this.name (or name). –  Joop Eggen Dec 19 '11 at 12:07
    
yeah, but I see that only if the variable is static ( property name ) –  user862010 Dec 19 '11 at 12:10
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You are implementing a method in an anonymous class, the closest thing Java has to closures. You can access to Application properties or methods by invoking it like this:

Application.this.instanceExampleMethod();

or

Application.this.property;

Your case is particular though, because you are in a static method, so you'll need to modify methods to static if you want to call them (or instantiate an Application and use it).

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You need to create an instance of Application that TimerTask can reference. In your code there is no such instance because static methods (like main) don't require one. So create an instance, and declare it as final so your anonymous TimerTask inner class has access to it.

public class Application {

       private String name = "Brad" ;

       public String getName()
       {
         return name;
       }

       private void privateMethod() {}

       public static void main ( String [ ] args ) {
              Timer time = new Timer ( );
              final Application application = new Application(); // instance
              time.schedule ( new TimerTask ( ) {
                     public void run ( ) {
                            System.out.println( "Name: "  + application.getName());
                            application.privateMethod(); // don't rely on this
                     }
              }, 0, 10000 );
       }
}

Note that in your case the main method is defined inside Application. This means that inside the TimerTask inner class you will have access to private (instance) fields of Application due to the class-level visibility in Java. In general you do not want to rely on this 'feature' and only access public methods on Application.

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