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is it possible in java to have a class where it has EventHandlers for with different functions? for example button1 will log you in, while button2 will log you out, is this possible? Here's the code I made it seems to be not working.

package event.handlers;

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

public class TheHandler implements ActionListener {

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent logInEvent) {
        System.out.println("Button Login");
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent cancelEvent) {
        System.out.println("Cancel Login");
    }
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No. You can not have a class implement two methods with the same function signature. How would the compiler know which one to call for different events? The name you give to the arguments has no meaning to the compiler.

As an alternative, you can create multiple anonymous action listeners that simply forward the call to a method that does have a unique name if you want everything to be in the same class.

public class TheHandler {

    public TheHandler() {
        JButton login, cancel;

        //initialize code here

        login.addActionListener( new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent logInEvent) {
                loginPerformed(logInEvent);
            }
        });
        cancel.addActionListener( new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent cancelEvent) {
                cancelPerformed(cancelEvent);
            }
        });
    }

    public void loginPerformed(ActionEvent logInEvent) {
        System.out.println("Button Login");
    }

    public void cancelPerformed(ActionEvent cancelEvent) {
        System.out.println("Cancel Login");
    }
}
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How about their implementations? wouldn't that do? –  KyelJmD Dec 19 '11 at 13:16
    
how do I registers the buttons from the other class? –  KyelJmD Dec 19 '11 at 15:25
    
@KyelJmD: You can have the ActionListener call any method you want. If that method happens to be in a different class, TheHandler would need a reference to an instance of that class. This isn't any different than calling a method on an object. You just happen to be doing it in your ActionListener definition. –  unholysampler Dec 19 '11 at 15:31

You either need two implementations of ActionListener, one for each button or the actionPerformed needs to determine the button by the event argument and take the appropriate action. Your code will not compile because the signatures for both methods are the same.

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can you provide me an example where a class contains , different handlers in one class?? –  KyelJmD Dec 19 '11 at 13:17

You may use getSource() or getActionCommand() method of ActionEvent.

@Override
public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent logInEvent) {
      Object src=logInEvent.getSource();
      String cmd=logInEvent.getActionCommand(); //It will return caption of button
      if(src==btn1)
       {
           //
        } 
      //Or
      if(cmd.equals("Button1")) { ... }

}
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You can not have multiple actionPerformed method in one class. Simple way is to do operation based on source of action like:

(in actionPerformed method)

if(e.getSource() == loginButtton) { // based on button variable if they are in same class and accessible in actionPerformed method
    loginMethod()
} else if(e.getSource == logoutButton) {
    logoutMethod()
}

or

if(e.getActionCommand().equals("loginButtton")) { // based on caption/text on button
    loginMethod()
} else if(e.getActionCommand().equals("logoutButtton")) {
    logoutMethod()
}

or you can have different anonymous class for different buttons like

loginButton.addActionListner(new ActionListerner(){
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent loginEvent) {
        loginMethod();
    }
});
logoutButton.addActionListner(new ActionListerner(){
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent cancelEvent) {
        logoutMethod();
    }
});
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The problem there is that your two method signatures are identical. When Java tries to figure out which method to call, it can't tell the difference between the two.

I can think of two ways to do what you want:

Presumably, you are registering the listeners on the buttons like cancelButton.addActionListener(...). So you can either provide each button with its own anonymous inner class:

loginButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent logInEvent) {
        System.out.println("Button Login");
    }
}
cancelButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent cancelEvent) {
        System.out.println("Cancel Login");
    }
}

or you can define a single actionPerformed method that checks the source of the call:

public class TheHandler implements ActionListener {

    JButton loginButton;
    JButton cancelButton;

    public TheHandler()
    {
        ...
        // Now, technically, this is bad form because you're leaking 'this'.
        // But as long as this will only be called after this constructor finishes 
        // initializing, it's safe.
        loginButton.addActionListener(this);
        cancelButton.addActionListener(this);
        ...
    }

    ...

    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
        if(evt.getSource() == loginButton)
            System.out.println("Button Login");
        else if(evt.getSource() == cancelButton)
            System.out.println("Cancel Login");
    }
}

Using anonymous inner classes can sometimes be clearer, because you see the code right next to the addListener call, but it also adds a lot of boilerplate, and if you're working on a very large progect that can take a while to load, reducing the number of classes can sometimes make it load a little faster (each anonymous inner class is another thing for the JVM to load).

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I don't want to have innerclasses since they are all cluttered, is there any other way ?? can i have a different method for that? –  KyelJmD Dec 19 '11 at 13:46
    
Try the second option, that doesn't use inner classes. –  Dogmatixed Dec 19 '11 at 16:45
    
how would I register them?? like cancelButton.addActionlistenr(handler); ?? –  KyelJmD Dec 20 '11 at 3:10
    
Yes, sorry, I'll edit that in. –  Dogmatixed Dec 20 '11 at 4:57

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