Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While using princomp() function in R, the following error is encountered : "covariance matrix is not non-negative definite".

I think, this is due to some values being zero (actually close to zero, but becomes zero during rounding) in the covariance matrix.

Is there a work around to proceed with PCA when covariance matrix contains zeros ?

[FYI : obtaining the covariance matrix is an intermediate step within the princomp() call. Data file to reproduce this error can be downloaded from here - http://tinyurl.com/6rtxrc3]

share|improve this question
    
Adding a sample input to make the the problem reproducible is useful to answerers. –  Richie Cotton Dec 19 '11 at 13:52
1  
If you look at stats:::princomp.default you'll see that the error occurs when you have negative eigenvalues in the covariance matrix. –  Richie Cotton Dec 19 '11 at 13:57
    
@ Richie Cotton : I wish I can provide. My data is huge (10K x 10K) and I haven't figured out the part that is causing the error. I will be happy to know if there is a way in which I can extract troubling part of data and post it here ! –  384X21 Dec 19 '11 at 14:01
1  
cv <- matrix(c(1, 2, 2, 1), nrow = 2); princomp(covmat = cv) reproduces the error. Don't know how relevant it is to your dataset. –  Richie Cotton Dec 19 '11 at 14:40
    
Thanks ! I could reproduce it from a small portion of original matrix, 1K x 1K (file size 5.5 MB). I was wondering how to post it. I am sure some elements of covariance matrix will be zero (or close to it) as my input data has large chunks of identical values. –  384X21 Dec 19 '11 at 14:45
show 8 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first strategy might be to decrease the tolerance argument. Looks to me that princomp won't pass on a tolerance argument but that prcomp does accept a 'tol' argument. If not effective, this should identify vectors which have nearly-zero covariance:

nr0=0.001
which(abs(cov(M)) < nr0, arr.ind=TRUE)

And this would identify vectors with negative eigenvalues:

which(eigen(M)$values < 0)

Using the h9 example on the help(qr) page:

> which(abs(cov(h9)) < .001, arr.ind=TRUE)
      row col
 [1,]   9   4
 [2,]   8   5
 [3,]   9   5
 [4,]   7   6
 [5,]   8   6
 [6,]   9   6
 [7,]   6   7
 [8,]   7   7
 [9,]   8   7
[10,]   9   7
[11,]   5   8
[12,]   6   8
[13,]   7   8
[14,]   8   8
[15,]   9   8
[16,]   4   9
[17,]   5   9
[18,]   6   9
[19,]   7   9
[20,]   8   9
[21,]   9   9
> qr(h9[-9,-9])$rank  
[1] 7                  # rank deficient, at least at the default tolerance
> qr(h9[-(8:9),-(8:9)])$ take out only the vector  with the most dependencies
[1] 6                   #Still rank deficient
> qr(h9[-(7:9),-(7:9)])$rank
[1] 6

Another approach might be to use the alias function:

alias( lm( rnorm(NROW(dfrm)) ~ dfrm) )
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I hadn't come across alias before. –  Richie Cotton Dec 22 '11 at 16:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.