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I have a few "setter" methods across classes, and for convenience I've added an optional parameter $previous, which takes an argument by reference and populates it with the existing value before replacing it with the new one. For example:

public function set_value($key, $value, &$previous = null)
{
    $previous = $this->get_value($key);
    $this->_values[$key] = $value;
    return $this;
}

This works fine; however in some circumstances, the corresponding "getter" method is a bit process intensive, and running it unconditionally is a waste. I figured I could test:

if(null !== $previous)
{
    $previous = $this->get_value($key);
}

This doesn't work though, as often the variable passed as the argument for $previous hasn't been previously defined in it's scope, and defaults to null anyway. The only solution I've hacked out is:

public function set_value($key, $value, &$previous = null)
{
    $args = func_get_args();
    if(isset($args[2])
    {
        $previous = $this->get_value($key);
    }
    $this->_values[$key] = $value;
    return $this;
}

Or, to one-line it:

if(array_key_exists(2, func_get_args()))
{
    // ...
}

I don't like the method body being reliant on the argument indices (when it seems it should be unnecessary) Is there a cleaner way to achieve what I'm after here?


I've tried:

if(isset($previous)){}

if(!empty($previous)){}

if(null !== $previous){}

Neither work.

Possible solutions thus far:

if(func_num_args() == $num_params){}

if(array_key_exists($param_index, func_get_args())){}

// 5.4
if(isset(func_get_args()[$param_index])){}

// 5.4
if(func_num_args() == (new \ReflectionMethod(__CLASS__, __FUNCTION__))
    ->getNumberOfParameters()){}

@DaveRandom -- So, something in the area of:

define('_NOPARAM', '_NOPARAM' . hash('sha4096', microtime()));

function foo($bar = _NOPARAM)
{
    // ...
}

@hoppa -- Use case:

$obj->set_something('some_key', $some_value, $previous) // set
    ->do_something_that_uses_some_key()
    ->set_something('some_key', $previous) // and reset
    ->do_something_that_uses_some_key()
    -> ...

Instead of:

$previous = $obj->get_something('some_key'); // get
$obj->set_something('some_key', $some_value) // set
    ->do_something_that_uses_some_key();
    ->set_something($previous) // and reset
    ->do_something_that_uses_some_key();
    -> ...
share|improve this question
3  
Couldn't you define the default value for $previous as FALSE (or some value of the "wrong" type) - then you know that it is null it was passed, but it it is FALSE (or whatever) it wasn't. This method has holes in it as well (the user might pass your default value) but I think it would be a decent approach - especially if you make the default value a long random string that is highly unlikely to be in the variable that was passed. –  DaveRandom Dec 19 '11 at 13:58
    
@DaveRandom -- The previous value could be a boolean false in some circumstances. I chose null for it's semantic intent, "absence of value". –  Dan Lugg Dec 19 '11 at 13:59
    
See edited comment about long random string - I admit it's not a beautiful or flawless approach, but it is a works 99.99999% approach... –  DaveRandom Dec 19 '11 at 14:01
    
@DaveRandom -- I suppose I could define some arbitrary string as the default, but that (much akin to the argument of md5) still holds possibility of collisions. I figured this would be trivial, and I was merely overlooking something. –  Dan Lugg Dec 19 '11 at 14:01
1  
What about yet another variable $fetch_previous and test explicitly for $fetch_previous == true? Too much rework? –  J0HN Dec 19 '11 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

possibly not how you wanted to solve your problem (testing somehow optional arguments), but this is how I would implement it:

public function set_value($key, $value)
{
    $this->_values[$key] = $value;
    return $this;
}
public function set_get_value($key, $value, &$previous)
{
    $previous = $this->get_value($key);
    $this->_values[$key] = $value;
    return $this;
}

Use case example:

$obj->set_get_something('some_key', $some_value, $previous) // set AND get
    ->do_something_that_uses_some_key()
    ->set_something('some_key', $previous) // and reset
    ->do_something_that_uses_some_key()
    -> ...

Why use another function?

This solution has a few advantages:

  1. the name is more explicit, less confusion for other coders
  2. no hidden side effects
  3. solves your problem with (undefined) variables already having a value
  4. no overhead of calling func_num_args, or some other "meta" function

EDIT: typo in code.

EDIT 2: removed default value of &$previous set_get_value() function (thanks to draevor)

share|improve this answer
    
Good alternative. A small correction - &$previous needn't have a default value in the second function, it's meant to be there. –  deviousdodo Dec 19 '11 at 17:47
    
indeed :) edited! –  catchmeifyoutry Dec 19 '11 at 17:50

Extracted from the comments / discussion above:

In order to check whether the argument was passed you have 2 options - check the value of the argument against a value (as you've done with null) or check the number of arguments.

If you go with the first option, there's no value that cannot be passed from outside the function, so there will always be a chance for false positives (the same thing that's happening now with null). DaveRandom's example with a random string should be enough for most cases though, but I see it as overkill.

I think the second option is the most clean (fast, readable, etc). As a small improvement over what you've already done with func_get_args, I'd use func_num_args - this way you'll be checking the number of passed arguments, not the argument indices.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @draevor -- Check my edit under "I've tried/Possible solutions", the last one (once 5.4 hits the streets) would work well for class agnostic re-usability in a trait, given the $previous parameter is always last. Like I said before, your answer is certainly the best candidate though, I'll let this sit for a bit, and mark yours if nothing else comes outta the woodwork. –  Dan Lugg Dec 19 '11 at 17:27

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