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Look at the code below and please help me solve the trick.

class TestTrick{

    public static void main(String args[])
    {

    }

    static marker()
    {

    System.out.println("programe executed");

    }

}

The result required from this program is that the program should print program executed, meaning that the marker method should be executed. But there are some rules:

  1. Nothing should be written in both the methods.
  2. No other class can be added to the program.
  3. The program must execute the output statement in the marker method.

It's been three days and I am unable to solve the problem because I am not a Java programmer. I have searched everything on internet to get a clue but I failed. Please someone help me run this program by strictly following the rules.

share|improve this question
    
If this is an homework, mark it as one. – Hurda Dec 19 '11 at 14:12
    
maybe switch the names of the functions :p? or better, just comment the end of the first and the beginning of the second method ! – Anthea Dec 19 '11 at 14:12
4  
This is will not compile. – MByD Dec 19 '11 at 14:12
    
If you aren't a Java programmer, why are you taking Java homework? – SLaks Dec 19 '11 at 14:13
    
coz m trying to be 1 – sum2000 Dec 19 '11 at 14:14

12 Answers 12

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I think what they're looking for is a static initializer.

static {
    marker();
}

This gets run when the class is loaded.

share|improve this answer

The problem is that you don't want a method for your marker - you just want a static initialization block:

class Trick {
    // not a method, just something to execute when the class is loaded
    static { System.out.println("executed"); }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    }

}

Results: http://ideone.com/bQAgT

If you've been provided the code already (which I'm not sure you have because static marker() isn't valid code) then you can simply call marker() from your static block.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer doesn't satisfy 3. the program must execute the output statment in the marker method. however it does produce the same output – Brad Dec 19 '11 at 14:15
    
@Brad the entire set constraints wasn't very clear. Given that the code provided in the OP didn't compile, I had to make some assumptions about what was and wasn't factually correct. I believe I have covered the two most probable cases in my answer. – corsiKa Dec 19 '11 at 14:17
    
That's a fair comment glowcoder, and I didn't mark down your answer. I was just commenting on it. – Brad Dec 19 '11 at 14:24

The static block will do the trick for you. But you have a syntax error in your program. Since marker is a method, it must have a return type. I am assuming void.

class testTrick {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
    }

    static void marker() {
        System.out.println("programe executed");
    }

    static {
        marker();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

you can use static initializer, that will be executed before the Main method can be run.

static {
     marker();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Not a "static constructor", but a static block. – Dave Newton Dec 19 '11 at 14:16
    
My bad, I've correcetd it – Hurda Dec 19 '11 at 14:26

This is easy. In the class add a static constructor to call the marker method and then in the constructor put in a system.exit

share|improve this answer
1  
"Nothing should be written in both the methods." Besides, why would you need a System.exit()? The program will end on its own. – Dave Newton Dec 19 '11 at 14:15

An even trickier program is

class testTrick {
    static { marker(); System.exit(0); } static void marker() {
        System.out.println("program executed");
    }
}

Note: marker has to provide a return type e.g. void or it won't compile. You can keep the main() method if you like, but it is never called.

The static initialiser is called before the main method so it can call another method and it can exit before you see a message saying no main() method found.

share|improve this answer
class testTrick
{

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
    }

    static 
    {
        marker();
    }

    static void marker()
    {
        System.out.println("programe executed");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

does this follow your rules ?, creating a static block will always execute as it gets stored along with the class files and it doen need a main method to call

class TestTrick{

    public static void main(String args[])
    {

    }

    static marker()
    {

    System.out.println("programe executed");

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
oops , seems like answered a question wchich already has the same ans , well may be a little explanation helps , though its a old question – Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Jan 9 '13 at 13:09
public class M
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {

    }
    static
    {
        marker();
    }
    public static void marker()
    {
         System.out.println("Done");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
class TestTrick{
public static void main(String args[])
{

}

static{
    marker();}
static void marker(){

System.out.println("programe executed");

}

Look at the requirements. You can do anything you want as long as you do not alter the methods.

So a static block(which will always execute in a program) is needed. Its not a method, and you can call marker() from there(which btw needs to be assigned a return type)

share|improve this answer
int i = 10 + + 11 - - 12 + + 13 - - 14 + + 15;

System.out.println(i);
share|improve this answer

You would need to call the marker method in the main method ie; something like this:

class testTrick {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        marker();
    }

    static void marker() {
        System.out.println("programe executed");
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
"Nothing should be written in both the methods." – Dave Newton Dec 19 '11 at 14:14

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