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I'm looking for a way to override/define some individual django setting from command line without additional settings files.

What I need right now is to set the DEBUG setting or logging level each time when I run my management command. But it would be nice to be able to set anything.

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Do you want to set DEBUG every time python manage.py runserver called or you have your custom command python manage.py foo and you want to set DEBUG inside it? – Kirill Dec 19 '11 at 17:30
    
I want to set any setting for any command. Like this: ./manage.py --set="DEBUG=True" runserver. Maybe the most easy way is to exec a command line parameter value right in settings.py. But I was hoping there is a way to not modify the source code at all. – raacer Dec 19 '11 at 18:26
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is my solution. Add the code below to the bottom of your settings file.

# Process --set command line option
import sys
# This module can be imported several times,
# check if the option has been retrieved already.
if not hasattr(sys, 'arg_set'):
    # Search for the option.
    args = filter(lambda arg: arg[:6] == '--set=', sys.argv[1:])
    if len(args) > 0:
        expr = args[0][6:]
        # Remove the option from argument list, because the actual command
        # knows nothing about it.
        sys.argv.remove(args[0])
    else:
        # --set is not provided.
        expr = ''
    # Save option value for future use.
    sys.arg_set = expr
# Execute the option value.
exec sys.arg_set

Then just pass any code to any management command:

./manage.py runserver --set="DEBUG=True ; TEMPLATE_DEBUG=True"
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I think this is only possible way since Django doesn't offer any hook for preprocessing command-line arguments. I wonder why you need it? – Kirill Dec 21 '11 at 0:14
    
Hi Kirill. Thank you for your comment. I was not sure about this. Also what I don't like about my solution is the way I store the option value. But I have not found a better way to save the option between imports. – raacer Dec 21 '11 at 14:44
    
Why I need this is just because this is fast and easy way to tweak any setting during the development process. I can play with settings without modifying the settings file. And I can be sure I will not forget to change things back (this makes problem sometimes). Also it may be usefull for production. It is possible to tweak settings for individual task on cron/celery/etc. Right now what I need is to run some management command for me with the debug output, and for my partner with usefull output only. I don't feel like I should change the command for such needs. – raacer Dec 21 '11 at 14:52

You can add custom option (ex. log level) to your command. Docs

Example:

from optparse import make_option

class Command(BaseCommand):
    option_list = BaseCommand.option_list + (
        make_option('--delete',
            action='store_true',
            dest='delete',
            default=False,
            help='Delete poll instead of closing it'),
        )
    # ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Denis. Sure I can. But I don't want to add this option to each command in each project. I'm looking for some more universal method. – raacer Dec 19 '11 at 15:34

You can make your settings.py more aware of it's current environment:

DEBUG = socket.gethostname().find( 'example.com' ) == -1

Here's an option for different databases when testing:

'ENGINE': 'sqlite3' if 'test_coverage' in sys.argv else 'django.db.backends.postgresql_psycopg2',
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Thanks. This method requires modifications for any constant that I need to override. Not exactly what I want. – raacer Dec 20 '11 at 9:18
    
There is no such thing as a constant in Python, any variable can be re-bound. Good luck. – gdonald Dec 20 '11 at 16:18
2  
This is not important. Let's say setting, not constant :) – raacer Dec 20 '11 at 17:04

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