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I've come across a weird bug with the Calendar's after method. The code below takes the current time and should return tomorrow's date with the same time. The bug happens when you run the code with the current time. Any ideas what's going on?

import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Vector;

public class NextDateTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Vector<Object> setup = new Vector<Object>();
        Calendar dt = Calendar.getInstance();
        SimpleDateFormat hour = new SimpleDateFormat("HH");
        SimpleDateFormat minute = new SimpleDateFormat("mm");

        setup.add(hour.format(dt.getTime()));
        setup.add(minute.format(dt.getTime()));

        for(int a=0; a<11; a++){
            dateTest(setup);
        }

    }

    static void dateTest(Vector<Object> vec){
        Calendar dt = Calendar.getInstance();
        SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm");
        System.out.println("Old time:" + format.format(dt.getTime()));

        dt.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, Integer.valueOf((String) vec.elementAt(0)));
        dt.set(Calendar.MINUTE, Integer.valueOf((String) vec.elementAt(1)));
        System.out.println(Calendar.getInstance().after(dt));
        if(Calendar.getInstance().after(dt)){
            dt.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, +1);
        }           
        System.out.println("New time:" + format.format(dt.getTime()));  
    }

}

Results:

Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
true
New time:12/20/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
false
New time:12/19/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
true
New time:12/20/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
false
New time:12/19/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
true
New time:12/20/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
false
New time:12/19/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
false
New time:12/20/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
false
New time:12/19/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
true
New time:12/20/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
false
New time:12/19/2011 10:38
Old time:12/19/2011 10:38
true
New time:12/20/2011 10:38
share|improve this question
    
Why are you passing around vectors of objects, parsing strings etc? Your test code looks like it's much more complicated than it should be. And why are you executing it 11 times? –  Jon Skeet Dec 19 '11 at 16:02
    
Do you know that Calendar has a .add() method? –  fge Dec 19 '11 at 16:06
    
@fge: He or she is calling it, so yes, I'd say (s)he does. :-) –  ruakh Dec 19 '11 at 16:11
    
Oops... Didn't see :/ –  fge Dec 19 '11 at 16:14
    
@Jon - the code can be simplified. I've taken this on from another dev. I haven't bothered with re-writing the source object. The loop shows the bug; dateTest() is only called once in the full code. –  kirbs Dec 19 '11 at 17:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's not a bug. Calendar.after(...) performs a strict inequality, and Calendar only stores millisecond precision. (For that matter, I'm not even sure if it's guaranteed to be accurate to the millisecond on all systems; I believe some systems don't give software access to time-deltas that small. But milliseconds are typical.) So if dateTest(...)'s two calls to Calendar.getInstance() occur within the same millisecond, then Calendar.after(...) will return false, and dt.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, +1) will not be performed.

share|improve this answer
    
The bug is still there even if sleep the loop every second to run dateTest() every second. –  kirbs Dec 19 '11 at 17:33
    
@kirbs: Sorry, but I don't think you understood my answer. (Unless it's I who's not understanding your reply.) The first line of dateTest(...) is Calendar dt = Calendar.getInstance();, and then later dateTest(...) checks if(Calendar.getInstance().after(dt)). It's those two lines that are problematically being executed in the same millisecond. If you want to address this by inserting a Thread.sleep(...), then you need to insert it somewhere between those two lines. –  ruakh Dec 19 '11 at 17:47
    
You're right, my bad. I didn't realize after() does the comparison of the two Calendar instances as milliseconds from the epoch. Thanks! –  kirbs Dec 19 '11 at 17:59
    
@kirbs: You're welcome! –  ruakh Dec 19 '11 at 18:03

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