Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a plugin with the following structure:

(function($) {
    $.fn.drawFieldsTable = function(options) {
        var settings = {
                url        : 'ajax/pathToFile.php'
        };

        if (options) {
            settings = $.extend(settings, options);
        }

        return this.each(function() {
            $this = $(this);
            $.ajax({
                url  : settings.url,
                type : 'GET',
                data: // some request data here
                success: function(result) {
                    drawFieldElements(result, $this);
                }
            });

            function drawFieldElements(fields, container)
            {
                var replacement = container.clone()
                                           .empty();
                $.each(fields, function(i) {
                    var field;
                    field = buildFieldItem(i, this);
                    replacement.append(field);
                });

                container.replaceWith(replacement);
            }

            function buildFieldItem(i, fieldDataObj)
            {
                var $field = $('<div></div>')
                        .addClass('field')
                        .attr('data-fieldname', i)
                        .attr('data-ord', fieldDataObj.ord);
                return $field;
            }
        });

    };

})(jQuery);

I experience a major memory leak on every buildFieldItem call. If I do not call this function or make it an empty function or just do not use its parameters in its scope - there is no leak. The leak only happens in Internet Explorer (8). In other browsers it's all ok. Requesting assistance. Thanks in advance.

UPDATE

I've updated my question for better demonstrating what buildFieldItem actually does. As soon as fieldDataObj may contain about 100 items, having these 4 lines solely causes a fountain, not a leak in IE.

UPDATE 2

I've replaced clone() and empty() with creating a new div and I also minified buildFieldItem to look like:

function buildFieldItem(i, fieldDataObj)
{
    var $field = $('<div></div>')
            .addClass('field');
    return $field;
}

Still leaking. The only pattern that doesn't leak is:

function buildFieldItem(i, fieldDataObj)
{
    var $field;
    return $field;
}

Looks like a complete nonsense. The less code in function - the smaller is an overall leak. Could it be that IE can't delete a reference to the whole function or smth like that?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure? buildFieldItem isn't even doing anything yet. –  Blazemonger Dec 19 '11 at 16:02
    
My #1 suspect for leaking would be container.clone().empty();. If all you want is a container, why not just make a new one from scratch with var replacement = $("<div>"); or whatever you need to cleanly make a replacement container from scratch. Cloning the entire thing and then emptying it is definitely a possible source of leaks. –  jfriend00 Dec 19 '11 at 16:39
    
@mblase75 Well, it creates a variable and stores a reference there. As soon as closure lifetime may be longer than parent function's lifetime, I believe this reference remains frozen in time and never ger GC'ed in IE. And in my real code I create many of those. Trying to figure out a workaround. But it is possible that I am wrong about the reason of the leak, that's why I am asking for help. –  noname Dec 20 '11 at 7:35
    
@jfriend00 Tried with no luck. Still leaking. –  noname Dec 20 '11 at 7:44
    
By the way, are you using the latest version of jQuery (1.7.1)? –  Blazemonger Dec 20 '11 at 13:49
show 3 more comments

2 Answers

Now that you've given us more of the buildFieldItem() function body, I see another possible leak.

Without full code in a runnable state, I can't say for sure, but when you set $field.attr('data-ord', fieldDataObj.ord), if .ord is any kind of DOM reference, you may be storing some sort of DOM reference as an attribute on the $field object. When you later do a .empty() on the parent, that reference might not get cleaned up in older versions of IE and thus it gets stuck and can't get garbage collected.

That is one of the reasons that jQuery invented the .data() method because it does not store data on the DOM object and it cleans up after itself with the .empty() method even on older versions of IE. Since I don't have a working version of the code, I can't say for sure that this is the issue, but I would suggest changing:

.attr('data-ord', fieldDataObj.ord);

to

.data('ord',  fieldDataObj.ord);

And, then change any other references that read that attribute to use .data() to read it.

I also think you're asking for trouble with this line since you're relying on both .clone() and .empty() to be perfect in cleaning up everything (even things that jQuery did not create) and never ever leak anything in any browser:

var replacement = container.clone().empty();

Much better to just create a brand new container since you want it empty to start with any ways as this can never leak prior data since it doesn't have any:

var replacement = $("<div>");

Response to your third disclosure on the actual contents of drawFieldElements():

Now, your code really isn't making sense to me. You have this:

        function drawFieldElements(fields, container)
        {
            var replacement = container.clone()
                                       .empty();
            $.each(fields, function(i) {
                var field;
                field = buildFieldItem(i, this);
                replacement.append(field);
            });

            container.replaceWith(replacement);
        }

You take your container. You clone and empty it. So, now you have only a top level with a class on it left in the clone. You append a bunch of content to the clone. Then, you replace the original container with your new cloned container. You're just asking for trouble with memory leaks with all this superfluous DOM manipulation.

Why not just clear your original container and append to it? Then there's no cloning, no replaceWith.

        function drawFieldElements(fields, container)
        {
            container.empty();
            $.each(fields, function(i) {
                container.append(buildFieldItem(i, this));
            });
        }

I have no idea if this helps with your memory leak, but cleaning up the code to remove all unnecessary DOM manipulation is always a step in a good direction.

share|improve this answer
    
I've followed your advice. Please, see my question UPDATE 2. –  noname Dec 20 '11 at 10:14
    
@noname - how do you know it's leaking? drawFieldElements() is adding stuff to the DOM so memory use should go up every time it's called. –  jfriend00 Dec 20 '11 at 14:57
    
Sure, but not as dramatically to crash a browser after a while. And it only happens in IE. I have multiple tabs open in Chrome and I can play around as much as I wish - the tabe with my project does not use more than 40mb, while IE increases memory usage any time I click a button which applies a plugin to element. Btw, drawFieldElements() is not adding stuff, it is entirely replacing what already exists. I've edited my question, my bad. –  noname Dec 20 '11 at 15:24
    
I added a response to your latest edit to my answer. I'm pretty frustrated now because your original question hid all the interesting part of the drawFieldElements() and buildFieldItem() functions making it a waste of time for us to have tried to answer. I sure hope you've disclosed the REAL code now. If you want any further help from me, please reduce your problem to a demonstrable set of code in a jsFiddle. We need to be able to actually see the memory leak in order to work on it rather than just continue guessing with only partial information about the problem. –  jfriend00 Dec 20 '11 at 19:14
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, I've finally found some time to go back to this old question and finalize. I've solved the problem quite quickly, but I've just been busy.

The following lines were causing memory leaks in IE:

var $isObligatory = $('<input>')
    .attr('type', 'checkbox')
    .attr('name', 'is-obligatory')
    .prop('checked', isObligatory)
    .change(function() {
        settings.gFields.applied[settings.subsection][i].obligate =
            ($(this).prop('checked')) ? 1 : 0;
    });

As you can see, it creates some kind of circular reference when adding a handler for the change event. The reference IE is not smart enough to break.

The fact is, commenting this out was my first try, but as soon as I've also had draggable functionality implemented in the same file, the leak remained, as draggables were causing it too! That's why I was struggling with that. Moving draggables outside the plugin code solved it.

Thanks everybody for posting comments and answers. I am sorry for not posting the full code, I thought I was smart enough to post only problematic lines. Sorry for late answer too.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.