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“Least Astonishment” in Python: The Mutable Default Argument

def stackdemo(stack=[]):
  stack.append('q')
  return stack

stackdemo()
print stackdemo()

returns ['q','q'], whereas

stackdemo([])
print stackdemo([])

with the same function returns just ['q'], as expected.

Why does Python appear to reuse the array if the default is used? Am I missing something?

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marked as duplicate by Karl Knechtel, mtrw, g.d.d.c, JBernardo, Paul McGuire Dec 19 '11 at 16:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

A list is a mutable object. From doc:

The default value is evaluated only once. This makes a difference when the default is a mutable object such as a list, dictionary, or instances of most classes.

Do it with None:

def stackdemo(stack=None):
    if stack is None:
        stack = []
    stack.append('q')
    return stack

stackdemo()
print stackdemo()
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one-liner, clearer version of the if block: stack = stack or [] –  JCotton Feb 29 '12 at 20:08
    
@JCotton - this is wrong. Imagine calling stackdemo(l) with l = [] defined before (and used elsewhere). –  eumiro Mar 1 '12 at 8:09
    
you are right, though the one-liner may work in the OP's situation. It'd also be wrong with stackdemo(mystr) with mystr="" or other False values like that. It depends on the use and meaning of the stack variable. If a value of None has separate meaning or the variable could hold other valid-but-False values, then there is no substitute for the explicit is None check. –  JCotton Mar 1 '12 at 16:41

In Python variables are passed by object reference, not by value.

This means that in this case you are modifying the stack=[] variable.

If you want to avoid this behaviour, than you have to generate the variable within the function since it will be generated on runtime in that case.

def stackdemo(stack=None):
    if stack is None:
        stack = []
    ...
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1  
The first line is not actually right. Read this –  JBernardo Dec 19 '11 at 16:43
    
@JBernardo: it is correct but depends on your definition of value. Since I left out the "object" part it might be a bit unclear. I'll clarify it a bit :) –  Wolph Dec 19 '11 at 17:02

Please check out this article on Default Parameter Values in Python.

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