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I am running a loop which tests whether or not a typed character was a letter. I want something like the "IN" function from sql or a way of providing similar functionality - something other than (variable == 'A' || 'a' || 'B' || 'b' || 'C' || 'c'...) of course. An example of what I mean using pseudo code would be:

char c;
while ((c = getchar()) != EOF)
{
      if (c == 'upper or lower case letter')
      {
          runthis();
      }

      else
      {
           dothis();
      }
}

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
isalpha() or similar is the way to go. But, if your input can be anything and your chars can be negative, remember to cast the value to unsigned char. /*signed*/ char name="Günther", *p=name; while (p) if (isalpha((unsigned char)*p)) ... p++ ... –  pmg Dec 19 '11 at 16:50
    
Thanks everyone! You're all my hero :D –  bqui56 Dec 20 '11 at 2:18

6 Answers 6

How about calling the isalpha() function?

char c;
while ((c = getchar()) != EOF)
{
      if (isalpha((unsigned)c))
      {
          runthis();
      }

      else
      {
           dothis();
      }
}

Make sure that you've included the <ctype.h> header! This header includes other similar functions like islower() and isupper(), which tell you whether a character is a lower-case or upper-case letter, respectively, and isdigit(), which tells you whether a character is a digit.

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1  
getchar returns an int. c should be an int so it can match EOF. –  EvilTeach Dec 19 '11 at 16:58

Use the isalpha function from the ctype.h header file. See the documentation here.

Usage:

#include <ctype.h>

...

if (isalpha(c))
{
    runthis();
}
else
{
    dothat();
}
share|improve this answer
    
already updated. –  Constantinius Dec 19 '11 at 16:31

You can use isalpha():

#include <ctype.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d\n", isalpha('x'));
    printf("%d\n", isalpha('5'));
}

There are several functions in this family, such as isupper(), islower(), isalnum(), isdigit(), isspace().

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C has a function called isalpha which handles your case.

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Addressing the question in the title (but less optimal for this case where the range is continuous).


A more general answer for integer types (char,short,int,enum,...) is to use switch/case and take advantage of the fall-through behavior:

switch (foo) {
case SOME_VALUE:
case ANOTHER_VALUE:
case COMMON_VALUE:
case NOT_SO_COMMON_VALUE:
   dowhatever(foo);
   break;
default:
   dotheotherthing(foo);
   break;
}

You can, of course, wrap the case up in a function to make your own iscategory() function (parallel to the standard library functions isspace(), isalpha(), etc). Just return for the right values rather than calling on...

share|improve this answer
    
What is iscategory()? –  Michael Mior Dec 19 '11 at 16:43
    
@Michael: A generic function name template, where category can be replaced with whatever logical category of thing identity that you're checking for. –  Cody Gray Dec 19 '11 at 16:45
    
I assumed as much. Just wasn't clear from the answer. –  Michael Mior Dec 19 '11 at 20:04

I can think of two quick ways.

First, if all the characters are in a single range, you can compare against the boundaries of the range.

if (c >= 'a' && c <= 'z')

The other method is to use a lookup table that is prefilled with boolean values for each character to declare whether it has the desired property.

Note that this answer is for the general case - there are existing library functions for many specific cases, such as determining an alpha character.

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2  
Of course, now some pedantic person will come along and point out that the C standard doesn't guarantee that the English alphabet maps to a contiguous range of character values. Oh wait... –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 19 '11 at 16:32
1  
@Oli, I anticipated that comment and specifically used the word "if". –  Mark Ransom Dec 19 '11 at 16:33
    
Well played!... –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 19 '11 at 16:34
    
Ah, but you didn't specify which range! A-Z occupy a contiguous range in an english alphabet, but it's not given that their representational values in some C implementation will occupy a contiguous range. Also, it's problematic with non-C locales. –  zvrba Dec 19 '11 at 16:51
    
@zvrba, the second method I describe works for the non-contiguous case. –  Mark Ransom Dec 19 '11 at 17:04

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