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Okay so I am trying to make a histogram from a three dimensional array of int in c. Here is the line where I edit the array;

buckets[(int)floor(x/splits)][(int)floor(y/splits)][(int)floor(z/splits)]++;

x, y, z were generated earlier in the program (this is in a loop) splits was asked as input from the user. Then I try to put this data into a histogram and the compiler is giving me an illegal instruction.

histogram[(int)buckets[i][j][k]]++;

I am pretty sure it is here because I put print statements in the program which worked until this point but not afterwords. Here is all of the relavent code.

    ff=fopen(fname,"r");
int buckets[split][split][split];
splits = (double) 1/split;
for(i=0; i<split; i++){
    fscanf(ff,"%lf",&x);
    fscanf(ff,"%lf",&y);
    fscanf(ff,"%lf",&z);
    buckets[(int)floor(x/splits)][(int)floor(y/splits)][(int)floor(z/splits)]++;    
    fclose(ff);  
}
int histogram[10];
for (i=0; i<split; i++) {
    for (j=0; j<split; j++){
        for(k=0;k<split;k++){
            histogram[(int)buckets[i][j][k]]++;
        }
    }
}
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2  
The most likely cause is that the value of buckets[i][j][k] is greater than the length of the histogram array. If that's not the problem, then please edit your question to include a minimal self-contained test-case (see sscce.org). –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 19 '11 at 17:13
1  
Compilers don't generate illegal instructions. Blowing the stack with a buffer overflow and causing a crash when the function returns is the common explanation. Use a debugger and update your question with what you found out. –  Hans Passant Dec 19 '11 at 17:16
2  
Using printf may not always give you the exact line that your program failed on because you have to make sure that the buffer is flushed by printing \n or calling fflush(stdout). To find the problematic line, you could instead run your program with valgrind. –  murgatroid99 Dec 19 '11 at 17:17
1  
What is split equal to? Is it set at runtime or a const value? –  Michael Dorgan Dec 19 '11 at 19:02
    
There were two problems with the code –  Treesrule14 Dec 19 '11 at 21:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you define your array:

int buckets[split][split][split];

You do not initialize it with something like:

memset(buckets, 0x00, sizeof(int) * split * split * split);

So buckets has unknown values in it. You then increment these numbers, but when you do:

histogram[(int)buckets[i][j][k]]++;

buckets[i][j][k] could be equal to anything. Solution is to add the memset() after the array declaration.

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There were two problems with the code 1) i needed to initialize the array to zero values Thanks for the new method I used a for loop instead. 2) I used fclose() within the for loop so it kept reopening and started from the begining –  Treesrule14 Dec 19 '11 at 22:55

Please share the actual values of the variables during run-time (using gdb) - split, x, y, z and splits.

If you see the correct values initially and suddenly seeing an abnormality, then you may be hitting a stack overflow. So try using dynamic memory allocation (which uses heap). Please try to use valgrind to detect any memory leaks.

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