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Don't you hate it when you have

class Foobar {
public:
    Something& getSomething(int index) {
        // big, non-trivial chunk of code...
        return something;
    }

    const Something& getSomething(int index) const {
        // big, non-trivial chunk of code...
        return something;
    }
}

We can't implement either of this methods with the other one, because you can't call the non-const version from the const version (compiler error). A cast will be required to call the const version from the non-const one.

Is there a real elegant solution to this, if not, what is the closest to one?

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marked as duplicate by derobert, DocMax, ecatmur, j0k, Jon-Eric Feb 8 '13 at 20:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
I think you need to indicate what the big chunk of code might be, and least to show why it can't be put in a separate function. –  James Hopkin May 13 '09 at 8:23
    
template lybraries explicitly create a "constType" for certain types. That avoid all mentioned problems with other approaches (requires a little bit discipline). –  DarioOO Aug 14 at 9:10

8 Answers 8

up vote 23 down vote accepted

I recall from one of the Effective C++ books that the way to do it is to implement the non-const version by casting away the const from the other function.

It's not particularly pretty, but it is safe. Since the member function calling it is non-const, the object itself is non-const, and casting away the const is allowed.

class Foo
{
public:
    const int& get() const
    {
        //non-trivial work
        return foo;
    }

    int& get()
    {
        return const_cast<int&>(static_cast<const Foo*>(this)->get());
    }
};
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3  
It's safe provided that foo isn't (and never becomes) a const member. If it does, then you ought to re-implement the non-const version of get (or go back to the drawing board and not make foo const after all), but what you actually do is fail to notice the problem because it all compiles OK. –  Steve Jessop May 13 '09 at 15:43
3  
"a const member". Or a const return from a call to some other function. Basically the compiler thinks it's returned as const, but "really" it's returned as non-const because of the cast. So it has to really be non-const in the case where "this" is non-const, and the compiler can't help you enforce that. –  Steve Jessop May 13 '09 at 15:57
2  
Right, but if you c'n'p, the compiler will tell you whether the code is valid. If you cast, you have to work it out for yourself. I'm not saying this is impossible, or that it's necessarily a bad idea, but C++ programmers do tend to lean on the compiler, especially for const-correctness and other forms of type safety. That is what it's there for. –  Steve Jessop May 13 '09 at 16:29
4  
static_cast<const Foo*>(this) should be const_cast<const Foo*>(this). –  ildjarn Aug 10 '11 at 21:13
1  
From the answer text: Since the member function calling it is non-const, the object itself is non-const, and casting away the const is allowed. After reading this statement many times, I finally understand why this approach is safe and correct. –  Boinst Aug 14 '12 at 0:43

How about:

template<typename IN, typename OUT>
OUT BigChunk(IN self, int index) {
    // big, non-trivial chunk of code...
    return something;
}

struct FooBar {
    Something &getSomething(int index) {
        return BigChunk<FooBar*, Something&>(this,index);
    }

    const Something &getSomething(int index) const {
        return BigChunk<const FooBar*, const Something&>(this,index);
    }
};

Obviously you'll still have object code duplication, but no source code duplication. Unlike the const_cast approach, the compiler will check your const-correctness for both versions of the method.

You probably need to declare the two interesting instantiations of BigChunk as friends of the class. This is a good use of friend, since the friend functions are hidden away close to the friendee, so there is no risk of unconstrained coupling (ooh-er!). But I will not attempt the syntax for doing so right now. Feel free to add.

Chances are that BigChunk needs to deference self, in which case the above order of definition isn't going to work very well, and some forward declarations will be needed to sort it out.

Also, in order to avoid some numpty finding BigChunk in the header and deciding to instantiate and call it even though it's morally private, you can move the whole lot into the cpp file for FooBar. In an anonymous namespace. With internal linkage. And a sign saying "beware of the leopard".

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Can you call BigChunk from a function declared as const? I don't think you can, because BigChunk is not declared as const. This is one major limitation of C++ templates. –  HelloGoodbye Mar 28 '13 at 7:19
    
@HelloGoodbye: BigChunk is not a member function. In the const overload of getSomething, I instantiate BigChunk with IN as const FooBar*, and so of course it's fine to pass this as the first parameter. –  Steve Jessop Mar 28 '13 at 12:09
    
Ah, I didn't notice it wasn't! Well, then this solution is actually quite nice. –  HelloGoodbye Apr 5 '13 at 11:03
    
I guess the only problem is that you have to send all private member variables you want to use in the function as arguments to the function, unless you have getter/setter methods for those variables. And then it might be a problem that you have to duplicate the argument types instead. You may even have to provide the template with the types of those arguments since they may have to be given in const/non-const versions. If you would accidentally use the incorrect type, you would probably end up with an implicit cast to another data type that you don't want to use, without noticing it. –  HelloGoodbye Apr 5 '13 at 11:09
    
On the other hand, you could declare the function as a const member function, still providing it with the this pointer, and you would automatically be able to access all private members through the this pointer. However, then the function would become another symbol that would be visible in all translation units that include the header file, and it would also have to be handled by the linker, which would in turn increase the linking time a little bit. I guess there is always some catch, huh? :) –  HelloGoodbye Apr 5 '13 at 11:19

Try to eliminate the getters by refactoring your code. Use friend functions or classes if only a very small number of other things needs the Something.

In general, Getters and Setters break encapsulation because the data is exposed to the world. Using friend only exposes data to a select few, so gives better encapsulation.

Of course, this is not always possible so you may be stuck with the getters. At the very least, most or all of the "non-trivial chunk of code" should be in one or more private functions, called by both getters.

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What?! Getters and setters break encapsulation? And friends don't? What if the class inner structure (private part) changes, the variables are renamed or eliminated? do you rewrite all friends? -1 from me... –  Paulius May 13 '09 at 8:00
2  
Yes, friends are really too unused. Lots of C++ devs see them as breaking encapsulation, when they instead (by words from Herb Sutter) actually increase encapsulation. –  Johann Gerell May 13 '09 at 8:02
2  
Paulius: Imagine you have 2 classes that use each others data. What is the best way to allow access to that data? public getters and setters or making them friends? With public getters and setters, any piece of code could use those getters and setters. With friends, only the friends can access the data. The scope of who can see and/or modify the data is hugely reduced, so yes, friend can give better encapsulation than getters and setters. I really don't know why people panic when friend is mentioned. friend is good. –  markh44 May 13 '09 at 8:21
2  
friend is good when the classes are actually good mates. friend is terrible if the classes barely know one another, or if another class comes along that wants to access the data, so you just add another friend. C++ != Facebook, and classes shouldn't respond to friend requests. I'd say if the classes weren't designed together, don't use friend. Once that's out of the way, yes, friend is good :-) –  Steve Jessop May 13 '09 at 15:40
    
Of course I agree and should have made clear in my answer that the classes involved in friendship must be very strongly related. It's not something that should be used for convenience (neither should getters and setters for that matter). –  markh44 May 13 '09 at 16:22

I would cast the const to the non-const (second option).

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1  
It would work, but i don't consider this very elegant... –  Benoît May 13 '09 at 7:36
    
@Benoît: No, not elegant, but pragmatic. –  Johann Gerell May 13 '09 at 8:00
4  
+1: I think this is one of the few valid uses of const_cast - it definitely beats code duplication and/or jumping through all sorts of hoops. –  James Hopkin May 13 '09 at 8:24
    
I am not arguing against that :) –  Benoît May 13 '09 at 8:41
    
If something ever gets declared const, then you will have a problem that you won't notice since your program still compiles. –  HelloGoodbye Mar 28 '13 at 7:17

Why not just pull the common code out into a separate, private function, and then have the other two call that?

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The concept of 'const' is there for a reason. To me it establishes a very important contract based on which further instructions of a program are written. But you can do something on the following lines :-

  1. make your member 'mutable'
  2. make the 'getters' const
  3. return non-const reference

With this one can use a const reference on the LHS if you need to maintain the const functionality where you are using the getter along with the non-const usage(dangerous). But the onus is now on the programmer to maintain class invariants.

As has been said in SO before, casting away constness of an originally defined const object and using it is an U.B. So i would not use casts. Also making a non-const object const and then again casting away constness would not look too good.

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The const reference to the object makes sense (you're putting a restriction on read-only access to that object), but if you need to allow a non-const reference, you might as well make the member public.

I believe this is a la Scott Meyers (Efficient C++).

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Public members? Not very OO-ish... –  Michael May 13 '09 at 7:59
    
I might retract this, because I didn't read the part about having "non-trivial code", making those functions not getters directly. –  swongu May 13 '09 at 8:01
    
Actually, when you think of it. If not misused, public members are the simplest and most straight-forward answer to this problem. If anyone can manipulate them by using the proper getter/setter, then in effect it is a public member. Maybe making it public is even better code because it tells the client, "I'm a public member, do anything you want to me". It is much more straight-forward than implementing two types of getters. –  Michael May 13 '09 at 10:24
    
"you might as well make the member public". No, because there's a "big, non-trivial chunk of code" in the getter. This getter isn't just exposing a member, it's doing significant work. Whether it's a good idea to then expose the result as non-const is of course another question... –  Steve Jessop May 13 '09 at 15:59

I dare suggest using the preprocessor:

#define ConstFunc(type_and_name, params, body) \
    const type_and_name params const body \
    type_and_name params body

class Something
{
};

class Foobar {
private:
    Something something;

public:
    #define getSomethingParams \
    ( \
        int index \
    )

    #define getSomethingBody \
    { \
        return something; \
    }

    ConstFunc(Something & getSomething, getSomethingParams, getSomethingBody)
};
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6  
Looks like obsfuscation to me. –  Kazark Feb 8 '13 at 17:20

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