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MongoDB's db.printShardingStatus command, when run from a mongos process, prints some json corresponding to the current state of accessible partitioned databases.

e.g.

--- Sharding Status --- 
  sharding version: { "_id" : 1, "version" : 3 }

  shards:
{  "_id" : "rs_a",  "host" : "rs_a/host1:27018,host2:27018" }
{  "_id" : "rs_b",  "host" : "rs_b/host3:27018,host4:27018" }
  databases:
{  "_id" : "admin",  "partitioned" : false,  "primary" : "config" }
{  "_id" : "test",  "partitioned" : false,  "primary" : "rs_a" }
{  "_id" : "users",  "partitioned" : true,  "primary" : "rs_a" }
        database.Coll chunks:
                        rs_b    4
                        rs_a    6
                    { "scope" : { $minKey : 1 } } -->> { "scope" : "0014669e-d4b0-45e8-b4ee-0f5de07f86d5" } on : rs_b { "t" : 2000, "i" : 0 }
                    { "scope" : "0014669e-d4b0-45e8-b4ee-0f5de07f86d5" } -->> { "scope" : "02726c5a-5f2c-4d6e-b124-b258aabcd3a0" } on : rs_b { "t" : 3000, "i" : 0 }
                    { "scope" : "02726c5a-5f2c-4d6e-b124-b258aabcd3a0" } -->> { "scope" : "0275fb19-7cec-4dfc-9150-97ceab4f23b5" } on : rs_b { "t" : 4000, "i" : 0 }
                    { "scope" : "0275fb19-7cec-4dfc-9150-97ceab4f23b5" } -->> { "scope" : "0847aae5-c41b-4470-8a9f-de90f2cb2c1e" } on : rs_b { "t" : 5000, "i" : 0 }
                    { "scope" : "0847aae5-c41b-4470-8a9f-de90f2cb2c1e" } -->> { "scope" : "084e756f-c4b0-4569-bb1e-37d7220b30c9" } on : rs_a { "t" : 5000, "i" : 1 }
                    { "scope" : "084e756f-c4b0-4569-bb1e-37d7220b30c9" } -->> { "scope" : "0894dd26-6b6f-4382-bdbd-d05199e913b9" } on : rs_a { "t" : 1000, "i" : 13 }
                    { "scope" : "0894dd26-6b6f-4382-bdbd-d05199e913b9" } -->> { "scope" : "08d0ffcb-c273-4bb7-8951-5f19e95b2fe4" } on : rs_a { "t" : 5000, "i" : 2 }
                    { "scope" : "08d0ffcb-c273-4bb7-8951-5f19e95b2fe4" } -->> { "scope" : "102282f1-9049-4a47-ac06-07d62399dd60" } on : rs_a { "t" : 5000, "i" : 4 }
                    { "scope" : "102282f1-9049-4a47-ac06-07d62399dd60" } -->> { "scope" : "ffe9ada1-367d-4358-ac98-d21a7194ee5f" } on : rs_a { "t" : 5000, "i" : 5 }
                    { "scope" : "ffe9ada1-367d-4358-ac98-d21a7194ee5f" } -->> { "scope" : { $maxKey : 1 } } on : rs_a { "t" : 1000, "i" : 4 }

I'm specifically curious about what the { "t" : 5000, "i" : 4 } values mean for each chunk. I cannot find any official documentation.

share|improve this question
    
I apologize for any confusion regarding the example in the question - it was taken from an example in the MongoDB Docs and posted to show the fields I was discussing. It does appear that the "lastMod" field in the chunks collection was indeed a timestamp prior to 2.0.1, and perhaps in sharding version 2 where the example was taken from. The timestamp in the example represents April 29, 2010. It would seem that the meaning that @Remon discusses correctly describes a version 3 value that was shoehorned into the timestamp field structure of version 2. –  jpredham Dec 20 '11 at 16:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The "t" and "i" values are the major and minor version of the chunk. "t" gets increased if the chunk is moved manually or by the balancer. At that point "i" will be reset to "0". "i" will be increased if the chunk is split.

The fact that your "t" is a timestamp like value is probably MongoDB trying to give it a value that it knows is functionally correct (max across cluster). I've never seen such a value for "t" in production environments. (EDIT <-- speculation)

By popular request the relevant bits of code in the server and complete explanation of why it looks the way it looks :

https://github.com/mongodb/mongo/blob/master/s/util.h (ShardChunkVersion) https://github.com/mongodb/mongo/blob/master/s/d_split.cpp (line 709 onwards) https://github.com/mongodb/mongo/blob/master/s/d_migrate.cpp (line 963 onwards)

Major and minor versions are integers. "t" looks like it's converted to/pushed in as a timestamp on output hence the multiplication by 1000 (https://github.com/mongodb/mongo/blob/master/bson/bsonelement.h line 357)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Remon, can you expand on your last comment about not seeing such a value for t in production environment? –  jpredham Dec 20 '11 at 16:44
    
It's just that I haven't really seen such a high value for "t". Typically it's a multiple of 1000. It's entirely valid. Perhaps there's some functionality where mongo sets "t" to a timestamp to make absolutely sure it's the highest "t" across the shards. That's speculation though ;) –  Remon van Vliet Dec 20 '11 at 17:08
    
See the recent edit with my actual production values. They seem to match what you've discussed. –  jpredham Dec 20 '11 at 17:48

This is a bson timestamp, type code \x11.

It consists of an epoch time stamp t and an increment i. Basically, the timestamp is a unix timestamp and the increment is used if multiple operations occur within the same second. The mongodb docs contain some in-depth information about it, including the special null semantics for them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! What would this mean in context of a chunk? Created date? Last operation? I ask because I'm trying to debug my values that don't conform to the epoch system: { "t" : 1000, "i" : 13 } –  jpredham Dec 19 '11 at 19:28
    
Sorry, I couldn't find any relevant information about optime in sharding. However, you really shouldn't have to care about it - it's an internal construct that is used for MongoDBs own synchronization purposes. What's going on, exactly? –  mnemosyn Dec 19 '11 at 21:08
    
It's just that the values are strange. The t values for all chunks are between 1000 and 5000 in increments of 1000, while the i values are between 1 and 13 for shard a but all zero for shard b. Kind of strange. Your answer is correct nontheless: querying the config database from mongos with db.chunks.find({ "lastmod" : { $type : 17 }}); I see all my chunks. (17 is the bson timestamp type number). –  jpredham Dec 19 '11 at 21:23
    
Thanks. That's rather strange indeed - maybe the use a kind of HiLo algorithm there. Or maybe it's a synchronization thing: synchronizing machines is a tricky problem and 'real' clocks are not of too much use in that matter anyway, so they might use the uptime instead of the real time here. But these are just guesses. –  mnemosyn Dec 19 '11 at 21:29
1  
The t is not a epoch timestamp by spec but the major component of the chunk version "t.i". The documentation being quoted here is completely unrelated to printShardingStatus and just happens to be an example that used "t" and "i" as fields. "t" gets incremented when the chunk is migrated to another shard (this resets "i") and "i" is increment when the chunk is split. –  Remon van Vliet Dec 20 '11 at 10:36

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