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This may seem like a silly question.

I am running a neural network through some tennis data. The objective of the network is to determine the probability of each player winning the match. There are around 40 inputs, and one output (being the probability of player A winning, (1 - output) for player B).

The inputs are various statistics and performance measures of each player over the last n matches. I've written the code that extracts these numbers from my database of tennis match results, which are then fed into the neural network.

The problem I have is as follows:

In the training set, the input values relating to the winner of the match being analysed by the network, will always be fed through the same input neurons. Because of this, the desired output will always be 1, because player A always wins (this is how my database is structured, player A is the winner of the match and player B is the loser).

How can I overcome this issue? Is it simply a case of randomising the player A and player B orders?

Hope this question makes sense.

Many Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would train every match twice, once with the input Winner - Loser and the output '1', once with the input Loser - Winner and the desired output '0'.

(Oh, and I don't think a neural network output can be interpreted as a probability, in the sense that if the ANN predicts some outcome with output 0.9 it will be right 9 out of 10 times.)

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Unless there is a good reason not to (see my comment), I agree about the ordering of the pair. Some neural networks do estimate probabilities directly, while others produce numeric output which can be calibrated to probability. –  Predictor Dec 20 '11 at 1:55
    
Thanks nikie, that's what i'll do. The outputs from the network won't be used directly as the probability, they will be derived elsewhere. Many thanks. –  Sherlock Dec 20 '11 at 15:45

Why don't you do a simple 50/50 split? Run half of the winners through the input neurons which you normally run them on and the other half of the winners through the other input neurons, that way you will have absolutely no bias. You can even stagger/stripe them by alternating the winner and looser on every single instance you train it on:

Neuron  Player
--------------
  1       W  
  2       L 
--------------    
  1       L 
  2       W 
--------------
  1       W  
  2       L 
--------------    
  1       L 
  2       W 

Randomization can help too, but I think that it will introduce bias (although it will be REALLY SMALL bias). At the end of the day you wouldn't know if the neural network is learning to predict the randomization function or if it's learning to predict the data, so just make it simple and guarantee yourself that it will learn the right thing.

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Your suggestion of randomization is sound: The "bias" you mention is negligible. –  Predictor Dec 20 '11 at 1:57

I think that some kind of shuffling (random or otherwise) makes sense.

If you're trying to train any kind of learner to pick the winner out of a pair of players, and you always present the first player as the winner, then it's entirely reasonable for it to learn that the first player is always the winner.

One simple way to fix this is to train on a double-sized data set: use both the pairs (A, B) and (B, A) where A is the winner.

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In pairwise modeling such as you describe, usually either: 1. each event is shown to the network once in each order, or 2. each event is shown once, in some canonical order ("home", "away").

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