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I have multiple variables which I set prior to creating an object, I want to check if any of those variables in null, if any variable then display an error. Is there a way to incorporate this in a foreach loop?

For eg.

Var Var1 = blah1;
Var Var2 = blah2;
Var Var3 = blah3;
Var Var4 = blah4;
Var Var5 = blah5;

foreach(var above, if any is null)
Errmessage

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
foreach requires that they be in an IEnumerable. If you specifically want foreach, you'll need to put each of those into a collection. – p.campbell Dec 19 '11 at 18:57
    
Are you looking to check ALL variables in the local function or only a subset? – M.Babcock Dec 19 '11 at 18:58
    
@p.campbell actually to be precise foreach needs an IEnumerable – Preet Sangha Dec 19 '11 at 18:58
2  
Wait a minute, you just said that you set them. If you set them to bad values then don't report an error; fix the bug so that you are not setting them to bad values anymore. – Eric Lippert Dec 19 '11 at 18:59
3  
@PreetSangha: To be precise foreach needs an implementation of the foreach pattern. It need not be an implementation of IEnumerable. – Eric Lippert Dec 19 '11 at 19:00
up vote 11 down vote accepted

I, personally, would have separate checks for each variable. On "error message" for multiple validation checks is a bad idea.

The main reason for this is that your "error message" should likely be an ArgumentNullException, which should provide the proper parameter name. This will be different per variable. Even if you use a custom exception, providing information about which variable was improperly specified is worth the extra coding effort.

That being said, if you want to do this, you can use:

var Var1 = blah1;
var Var2 = blah2;
var Var3 = blah3;
var Var4 = blah4;
var Var5 = blah5;

if ( (new object[] {Var1, Var2, Var3, Var4, Var5}).Any(v => v==null))
    throw new Exception("Your error here");
share|improve this answer
    
I agree, seperate checks are better. If I nest all the variables in one If statement, is there a way to know which variable was null? e.g. if(var1 != null && var2 != null && var3 != null) – user793468 Dec 19 '11 at 19:23
    
@user793468 No, not directly. It's part of the problem here. If you are just trying to shorten the code, you could use something like CuttingEdge.Conditions: conditions.codeplex.com It'd let you write the checks as one line per variable, and still provide relatively meaningful exceptions. – Reed Copsey Dec 19 '11 at 19:36

Put them in an IEnumerable such as an array

foreach(var v in new object[] { var1, var2, .... }){
 if(v == null) {
   Errmessage...
 }
}
share|improve this answer

Put them into a list of object and loop over it:

List<object> list = new List<object>();
list.add(Var1);
list.add(Var2);
// etc.

foreach(object obj in list)
{
    if(obj == null) //message
}
share|improve this answer

My first inclination would be not to use separate variables but instead one Dictionary:

var dict = new Dictionary<string, object>();

dict["var1"] = blah1;
// etc.

foreach(var value in dict.Values)
{
    if(value == null)
        throw new Exception(errorMessage);
}
share|improve this answer

One way would be to track them in a list to the side and then loop through the list:

List<object> objects = new ....;

Var Var1 = blah1;  objects.add(Var1)...
Var Var2 = blah2;  ...
Var Var3 = blah3;  ...
Var Var4 = blah4;  ...
Var Var5 = blah5;  ...

foreach(var objRef, in objects)
    if( objRef == null )
       Errmessage; break ?
share|improve this answer

If the number of your variables may change in the future and you don't want to manually list all of them then I suggest use this:

using System.Reflection;

class MyClass{
    var Var1;
    var Var2;
    ...
    var infos = typeof(MyClass).GetFields();
    foreach(var info in infos)
    {
        if(info.GetValue(this)==null) ShowErrorMessage(info.Name);
    }
}

note: you can replace GetFields with GetMembers or GetProperties...

share|improve this answer

Put all those variables into a list. You can then loop over them as you want to.

share|improve this answer

In order to get the "if any" semantics you are after, you could create a static class as follows (I put it in my TypeExtensions namespace)

public static class NotAssigned {
    public static bool AnyOf( params object[] Objects){
        foreach (var o in Objects)
            if (o == null)
                return true;
        return false;
    }
}

Usage would be as follows

Var Var1 = blah1;
Var Var2 = blah2;
if (NotAssigned.AnyOf( blah1, blah2))
    throw new Exception

With a few minor logic adjustments, you can throw on an AllOff function, also perhaps an "Assigned" class, with AnyOf and AllOf.

So far I've only made use of NotAssigned.AnyOf

share|improve this answer

You can use the params parameter operator to pass a list of null parameters:

    public static void ThrowIfNull(params object[] input)
    {
        foreach (var item in input)
        {
            //Your choice of how you want to handle this. I chose an exception.
            throw new NullReferenceException();
        }
    }

which will allow you to:

    int? nullableInt = null;
    string someNullString = null;

    ThrowIfNull(nullableInt, someNullString);

There are also other ways you can approach this problem. For instance you can create an extension method for IEnumerable:

public static class NullExtensionMethods
{
    public static void ThrowIfHasNull<T>(this IEnumerable collection)
        where T : Exception, new()
    {
        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                throw new T();
            }
        }
    }

    public static void ThrowIfHasNull(this IEnumerable collection)
    {
        ThrowIfHasNull<NullReferenceException>(collection);
    }
}

Making this possible:

 string someNullString = null;
 new string[] { someNullString }.ThrowIfHasNull();

 //or for context specific exceptions

 new string[] { someNullString }.ThrowIfHasNull<ArgumentNullException>();

Though I prefer to avoid exceptions where possible. You can make the following changes:

public static class NullExtensionMethods
{
    public static bool HasNull(this IEnumerable collection)
    {
        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            if (item == null)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }
}

Allowing you to handle things much more gracefully:

var nullDetected = new string[] { someNullString }.HasNull();

Since we are using extension methods, we can further exploit the feature by adding overloads for specific cases. So for instance an empty string can be treated the same way String.IsNullOrEmpty. In this case I would add an extra extension method HasNullOrEmpty:

    public static bool HasNullOrEmpty(this IEnumerable<string> collection)
    {
        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(item))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }

Though the trade of is that the type must be IEnumerable<string>

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