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I have a problem rewriting a loop:

else if( "d" == option || "debug" == option )
{
    debug(debug::always) << "commandline::set_internal_option::setting debug options: "
                         << value << ".\n";
    string::size_type index = 0;
    do
    {
        const string::size_type previous_index = index+1;
        index=value.find( ',', index );
        const string item = value.substr(previous_index, index);
        debug::type item_enum;
        if( !map_value(lib::debug_map, item, item_enum) )
            throw lib::commandline_error( "Unknown debug type: " + item, argument_number );

        debug(debug::always) << "commandline::set_internal_option::enabling " << item
                             << " debug output.\n";
        debug(debug::always) << "\n-->s_level=" << debug::s_level << "\n";
        debug::s_level = static_cast<debug::type>(debug::s_level ^ item_enum);
        debug(debug::always) << "\n-->s_level=" << debug::s_level << "\n";
    } while( index != string::npos );
}

value is something like string("commandline,parser") and the problem is that in the first run, I need substr(previous_index, index), but in every subsequent iteration I need substr(previous_index+1, index) to skip over the comma. Is there some easy way I'm overlooking or will I have to repeat the call to find outside the loop for the initial iteration?

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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not update previous_index after taking the substr?

string::size_type index = 0;
string::size_type previous_index = 0;
do {
  index=value.find( ',', previous_index );
  const string item = value.substr(previous_index, index);
  previous_index = index+1;
} while( index != string::npos );

Unchecked, but this should do the trick (with only one more word of memory).

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You sir, are the winner. This is exactly the simple thing I was overlooking. Thanks. –  rubenvb Dec 19 '11 at 20:14
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Since your goal is to prevent code duplication:

std::vector<std::string> v;
boost::split(v, value, [](char c) { c == ','; });

If you want to create your own split function, you can do something like this:

template<typename PredicateT>
std::vector<std::string> Split(const std::string & in, PredicateT p)
{
    std::vector<std::string> v;
    auto b = in.begin();
    auto e = b;
    do {
        e = std::find_if(b, in.end(), p);
        v.emplace_back(b,e);
        b = e + 1;        
    } while (e != in.end());

    return v;
}
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Thanks, but I'd prefer no boost. +1 though. As to why no Boost: I haven't seen a good reason yet. C++11 has been good enough. –  rubenvb Dec 19 '11 at 19:33
    
Then write a simple string splitting routine in C++11. –  Chad Dec 19 '11 at 19:36
    
@rubenvb: Then take a look at boost's implementation, and write a split function for your own personal library. This is one of the most useful functions that exists for text processing. I guarantee you will need it again. –  Benjamin Lindley Dec 19 '11 at 19:37
    
boost::split, boost::lexical_cast, boost::iterators, boost::mult-array, boost::multi-index, ... –  tstenner Dec 19 '11 at 19:38
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Start at -1?

string::size_type index = -1;
do
{
    const string::size_type previous_index = index + 1;
    index=value.find(',', previous_index);
    const string item = value.substr(previous_index, index - previous_index);
} while( index != string::npos );
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size_t(-1) + 1 != 0. I checked. –  rubenvb Dec 19 '11 at 19:43
    
Negate my last comment, I was mistesting (if there is such a thing). You're the runner-up IMO. –  rubenvb Dec 19 '11 at 20:14
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A stupid (and somewhat unreadable) solution would be something like this:

string::size_type once = 0;
/* ... */
const string::size_type previous_index = index+1 + (once++ != 0); // or !!once
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Hmmm... That be equivalent to an if inside the loop really :( –  rubenvb Dec 19 '11 at 19:27
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First, I think there's a small error:

In your code, the expression index=value.find( ',', index ); doesn't change the value of index if it already is the index of a comma character within the string (which is always the case except for the first loop iteration).

So you might want to replace while( index != string::npos ); with while( index++ != string::npos ); and previous_index = index+1 with previous_index = index.

This should also solve your original problem.

To clarify:

string::size_type index = 0;
do
{
    const string::size_type previous_index = index;
    index = value.find( ',', index );
    const string item = value.substr(previous_index, index - previous_index);
} while( index++ != string::npos );
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