Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to distribute a sysadmin utility inside our company that depends on not-yet-released gems (say, the github master for fog). We have a private GitHub organization account already, and we all have ssh keys for it.

But: While Bundler can install gems with a simple

gem "sysadmin", :git => "git://github.com/ourorg/sysadmin.git"`

there's no way I can find to do that with bare RubyGems. And people are going to want to install other gems on their own machine, so I wouldn't want to force everyone to use Bundler for their home directory.

I can think of a few solutions, none ideal:

  • Make a "sysadmin" project that has a Gemfile, have everyone clone it, and have them cd into that project dir to run the utility.
  • Have them manually download and build the gem on their system every time it changes.
  • Use a third-party gem-hosting repo, and count on security-by-obscurity to prevent outsiders from finding it. Ick.
  • Set up a secure internal-only server to run gem server or the like. We currently don't have one (everything's in the cloud), and I'd like to avoid setting one up just for this.

There must be a better way.. what is it? Is there a way to set up an old-style gem source in a github repository?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use a third-party gem-hosting repo, and count on security-by-obscurity to prevent outsiders > from finding it. Ick.

I wanted to suggest Gemfury, but it sounds like you're not interested in 3rd-party gem-hosting solutions. Can you tell me more about your security concerns?

Disclaimer: I work on Gemfury

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking about a public gem-hosting repo; I wasn't aware that sites like Gemfury offered authenticated gem repos. That may be the best solution, though there's also something in Bundler 1.1 that may help.. – Jay Levitt Feb 10 '12 at 15:09
    
To which Bundler 1.1 feature are you referring? – Michael Feb 10 '12 at 23:31
    
bundler --standalone, which would freeze the gems in place; that's workable for us and free, but I think your solution comes closest to the problem as I expressed it, so I'll accept! – Jay Levitt Feb 17 '12 at 15:28

there's no way I can find to do that with bare RubyGems

This is covered in the documentation. Use the :path option in your Gemfile:

gem "nokogiri", :path => "~/sw/gems/nokogiri"

And there's no reason this would interfere with their home directory or their own gems. They're not all going to want to put your utilities in their home directory anyway. Let them put the files in whatever directory they want, then either tell them to add it to their $PATH or write a Rake task that automatically creates symlinks in e.g. /usr/bin for them.

share|improve this answer
    
That's Bundler, not rubygems; there is no Gemfile for bare rubygems - and I would want :git, not :path, since they don't have the git repo locally. – Jay Levitt Dec 19 '11 at 21:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.