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I want to create NULL terminated array in the constructor.

class Test
{
    char name [30];
    char Address[100]
};

Test::Test()
{
    memset(name ,0, 30);
    memset(Address, 0, 100);
}

Is this the correct way to initialize an array to NULL?

Is there any good alternative to this?

share|improve this question
    
are you trying to replicate c-strings? –  Daniel A. White Dec 19 '11 at 19:42
2  
This hardly deserves to be called C++. –  Kerrek SB Dec 19 '11 at 19:45
    
common Guys c string can be used inside C++ classes –  Chris_vr Dec 19 '11 at 19:46
3  
You asked for a "good alternate" (sic). If you don't want to accept good advice, why do you ask for it? The code you've written is terrible, and you aren't doing anyone a favour by trying to salvage it. That's not how one writes C++, period. –  Kerrek SB Dec 19 '11 at 19:47
    
please use consistent data member naming, ie "address". –  vidstige Dec 19 '11 at 19:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're planning on using C-style strings, you need only set the first character to a null terminator.

name[0] = Address[0] = 0;

But, in the long run, you will be better off using std::string instead.

share|improve this answer

I'd probably do this:

class Test
{
    std::string name;
    std::string address;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I can't use STL.Suggest something without STL –  Chris_vr Dec 19 '11 at 19:42
    
@Chris_vr: How not? Imagine it's not STL, it's the C++ standard library. –  ybungalobill Dec 19 '11 at 19:44
6  
@Chris_vr: -1 for failing to specify your arcane constraints in your question and then complaining about a perfect answer. –  Kerrek SB Dec 19 '11 at 19:45
4  
@Chris_vr: Why are you allowed to use some parts of the C++ standard library (memset) and not others (std::string)? Are you using C++ or not? –  Nicol Bolas Dec 19 '11 at 19:45
    
@NicolBolas I am not aware memset is function of C++.Anyway I need to change the code –  Chris_vr Dec 19 '11 at 19:52

The proper C++ idiom is to value-initialize your C-strings in your constructor's initialization list:

class Test
{
    char name[30];
    char address[100];

public:
    Test();
};

Test::Test()
  : name(),
    address()
{ }

This will have the net effect of all elements of Test::name and Test::address being set to '\0'.

Of course, it would be even better to avoid raw C-strings in the first place, but other answers have already made that point...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I guess this is better approch. –  Chris_vr Dec 19 '11 at 19:54

To store strings, it's sufficient put first char to 0. I.e.

Test::Test()
 {
      name[0] = Address[0] = 0;
 }

If you want (for some specific your purpose) to fill the entire arrays, use sizeof to avoid hardcoding indexes.

Test::Test()
 {
      memset(name, 0, sizeof(name));
      memset(Address, 0, sizeof(Address));
 }
share|improve this answer

I don't know exactly what you want to do, but I should do:

Test::Test()
{
   name[0] = 0;
   Address[0] = 0;
}

in this way you can interpret your variable as empty string.

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