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Following a haskell tutorial, the author provides the following implementation of the withFile method:

withFile' :: FilePath -> IOMode -> (Handle -> IO a) -> IO a  
withFile' path mode f = do  
    handle <- openFile path mode   
    result <- f handle  
    hClose handle  
    return result  

But why do we need to wrap the result in a return? Doesn't the supplied function f already return an IO as can be seen by it's type Handle -> IO a?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're right: f already returns an IO, so if the function were written like this:

withFile' path mode f = do  
    handle <- openFile path mode   
    f handle

there would be no need for a return. The problem is hClose handle comes in between, so we have to store the result first:

result <- f handle

and doing <- gets rid of the IO. So return puts it back.

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Oh d'oh! Completely missed the sucking <- operator! –  drozzy Dec 19 '11 at 20:26
1  
Could it also be let result = f handle; hClose handle; result or did I fail monad comprehension again? –  delnan Dec 19 '11 at 20:44
3  
@delnan that would be do { handle <- openFile mode path; hClose handle; f handle; }, so f handle would probably complain about a closed handle. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 19 '11 at 20:55
    
@DanielFischer: Right, brain fart. The resulting IO value ("action") wouldn't be evaluated just from the let. –  delnan Dec 19 '11 at 21:55
1  
@drozzy An alternative ending: f handle >>= \result -> hClose handle >> return result. Here >>= is used to get rid of IO, I hope you didn't miss >>= too. There are many different suckings, e.g. >=> and their reverse counterparts =<< and <=<. –  nponeccop Dec 20 '11 at 20:19

This is one of the tricky little things that confused me when I first tried Haskell. You're misunderstanding the meaning of the <- construct in do-notation. result <- f handle doesn't mean "assign the value of f handle to result"; it means "bind result to a value 'extracted' from the monadic value of f handle" (where the 'extraction' happens in some way that's defined by the particular Monad instance that you're using, in this case the IO monad).

I.e., for some Monad typeclass m, the <- statement takes an expression of type m a in the right hand side and a variable of type a on the left hand side, and binds the variable to a value. Thus in your particular example, with result <- f handle, we have the types f result :: IO a, result :: a and return result :: IO a.

PS do-notation has also a special form of let (without the in keyword in this case!) that works as a pure counterpart to <-. So you could rewrite your example as:

withFile' :: FilePath -> IOMode -> (Handle -> IO a) -> IO a  
withFile' path mode f = do  
    handle <- openFile path mode   
    let result = f handle  
    hClose handle  
    result

In this case, because the let is a straightforward assignment, the type of result is IO a.

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1  
Cool! I call the <- the suck operator, as it sucks the value out of the rhs :-) –  drozzy Dec 20 '11 at 1:11

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