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How to make an ajax call using javascript, without using jquery?

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10 Answers 10

With "vanilla" JavaScript:

<script type="text/javascript">
function loadXMLDoc() {
    var xmlhttp;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        // code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
        xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    } else {
        // code for IE6, IE5
        xmlhttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4 ) {
           if(xmlhttp.status == 200){
               document.getElementById("myDiv").innerHTML = xmlhttp.responseText;
           }
           else if(xmlhttp.status == 400) {
              alert('There was an error 400')
           }
           else {
               alert('something else other than 200 was returned')
           }
        }
    }

    xmlhttp.open("GET", "ajax_info.txt", true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}
</script>

With jQuery:

$.ajax({
    url: "test.html",
    context: document.body,
    success: function(){
      $(this).addClass("done");
    }
});
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3  
To be fair, both snippets are written in JavaScript, just first one is vanilla JavaScript. –  Kirill Gordeenko Jun 13 '13 at 13:02
332  
Please stop supporting IE5/IE6 –  Archibald Aug 14 '13 at 13:23
32  
You can replace the magic number 4 with XMLHttpRequest.DONE. –  Drew Noakes Mar 3 '14 at 18:15
5  
How about error callback? –  Fractaliste May 21 '14 at 8:52
3  
@Archibald there's going to be a resurgence of Windows 95 machines just like there was a resurgence of Sega Genesis –  Nick Manning Oct 11 '14 at 0:10

Using the following snippet you can do similar things pretty easily, like this:

ajax.get('/test.php', {foo: 'bar'}, function() {});

Here is the snippet:

var ajax = {};
ajax.x = function() {
    if (typeof XMLHttpRequest !== 'undefined') {
        return new XMLHttpRequest();  
    }
    var versions = [
        "MSXML2.XmlHttp.5.0",   
        "MSXML2.XmlHttp.4.0",  
        "MSXML2.XmlHttp.3.0",   
        "MSXML2.XmlHttp.2.0",  
        "Microsoft.XmlHttp"
    ];

    var xhr;
    for(var i = 0; i < versions.length; i++) {  
        try {  
            xhr = new ActiveXObject(versions[i]);  
            break;  
        } catch (e) {
        }  
    }
    return xhr;
};

ajax.send = function(url, callback, method, data, sync) {
    var x = ajax.x();
    x.open(method, url, sync);
    x.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (x.readyState == 4) {
            callback(x.responseText)
        }
    };
    if (method == 'POST') {
        x.setRequestHeader('Content-type', 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded');
    }
    x.send(data)
};

ajax.get = function(url, data, callback, sync) {
    var query = [];
    for (var key in data) {
        query.push(encodeURIComponent(key) + '=' + encodeURIComponent(data[key]));
    }
    ajax.send(url + '?' + query.join('&'), callback, 'GET', null, sync)
};

ajax.post = function(url, data, callback, sync) {
    var query = [];
    for (var key in data) {
        query.push(encodeURIComponent(key) + '=' + encodeURIComponent(data[key]));
    }
    ajax.send(url, callback, 'POST', query.join('&'), sync)
};
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7  
thanks for the effort! why not put this up on github? –  Neutralizer Mar 15 '14 at 16:58
    
This is a really great jumpstart, but I think you're missing something that features in @3nigma's answer. That is, I'm not sure how much it makes sense to make certain requests (all get and some post) without returning the server response. I added another line at the end of the send method -- return x.responseText; -- and then return each of the ajax.send calls. –  Sam Aug 13 '14 at 10:37
1  
@Sam you [typically] can't return as its an asynchronous request. You should handle the response in a callback. –  Petah Aug 13 '14 at 11:18
    
@Petah Oh, of course, that makes sense. (Duh, Sam.) Super cool if you could give an example of a call back you'd use? –  Sam Aug 13 '14 at 12:00
1  
@JonnyLeeds see stackoverflow.com/a/4073451/268074 –  Petah Dec 17 '14 at 22:09
 var xhReq = new XMLHttpRequest();
 xhReq.open("GET", "sumGet.phtml?figure1=5&figure2=10", false);
 xhReq.send(null);
 var serverResponse = xhReq.responseText;
 alert(serverResponse); // Shows "15"

http://ajaxpatterns.org/XMLHttpRequest_Call

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2  
Will this work cross-browser? –  Benubird Apr 26 '13 at 16:55
24  
Don't do synchronous calls. Use xhReq.onload and use the callbacks. –  apx May 5 '13 at 20:52
2  
@FellowStranger oReq.onload = function () { /*this.responseText*/ }; –  apx Oct 31 '13 at 14:14
1  
@kenansulayman What's wrong with synchronous call? Sometimes it fits the best. –  andreyne Feb 2 '14 at 17:00
1  
@Rafee been out from the web dev scene for a year now, just a piece of advice though REFRAIN FORM IE :) –  3nigma Apr 28 '14 at 20:20

You can use the following function:

function callAjax(url, callback){
    var xmlhttp;
    // compatible with IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
    xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function(){
        if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200){
            callback(xmlhttp.responseText);
        }
    }
    xmlhttp.open("GET", url, true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}

You can try similar solutions online on these links:

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1  
@tomsmeding :D , I'll consider it next time, but for the context of this question, these 2 online trials are enough –  AbdelHady Feb 25 '14 at 15:09
1  
very nice! Much more to the point than the accepted answer –  Jonny Leeds Dec 17 '14 at 12:52

You can get the correct object according to the browser with

function getXmlDoc() {
  var xmlDoc;

  if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
    // code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
    xmlDoc = new XMLHttpRequest();
  }
  else {
    // code for IE6, IE5
    xmlDoc = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
  }

  return xmlDoc;
}

With the correct object, a GET might can be abstracted to:

function myGet(url, callback) {
  var xmlDoc = getXmlDoc();

  xmlDoc.open('GET', url, true);

  xmlDoc.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if (xmlDoc.readyState === 4 && xmlDoc.status === 200) {
      callback(xmlDoc);
    }
  }

  xmlDoc.send();
}

And a POST to:

function myPost(url, data, callback) {
  var xmlDoc = getXmlDoc();

  xmlDoc.open('POST', url, true);
  xmlDoc.setRequestHeader("Content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");

  xmlDoc.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if (xmlDoc.readyState === 4 && xmlDoc.status === 200) {
      callback(xmlDoc);
    }
  }

  xmlDoc.send(data);
}
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1  
+1 because this is a really complete solution –  Everton Agner Nov 21 '13 at 12:13

A small combination from a couple of the examples below and created this simple piece:

function ajax(url, method, data, async)
{
    method = typeof method !== 'undefined' ? method : 'GET';
    async = typeof async !== 'undefined' ? async : false;

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
    {
        var xhReq = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else
    {
        var xhReq = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }


    if (method == 'POST')
    {
        xhReq.open(method, url, async);
        xhReq.setRequestHeader("Content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
        xhReq.setRequestHeader("X-Requested-With", "XMLHttpRequest");
        xhReq.send(data);
    }
    else
    {
        if(typeof data !== 'undefined' && data !== null)
        {
            url = url+'?'+data;
        }
        xhReq.open(method, url, async);
        xhReq.setRequestHeader("X-Requested-With", "XMLHttpRequest");
        xhReq.send(null);
    }
    //var serverResponse = xhReq.responseText;
    //alert(serverResponse);
}

// Example usage below (using a string query):

ajax('http://www.google.com');
ajax('http://www.google.com', 'POST', 'q=test');

OR if your parameters are object(s) - minor additional code adjustment:

var parameters = {
    q: 'test'
}

var query = [];
for (var key in parameters)
{
    query.push(encodeURIComponent(key) + '=' + encodeURIComponent(parameters[key]));
}

ajax('http://www.google.com', 'POST', query.join('&'));

Both should be fully browser + version compatible.

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I was looking for away to include promises with ajax and exclude jQuery. There's an article on HTML5 Rocks that talks about ES6 promises (could polyfill with a promise library like Q) then use the code snippet that I copied from the article.

function get(url) {
  // Return a new promise.
  return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
    // Do the usual XHR stuff
    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.open('GET', url);

    req.onload = function() {
      // This is called even on 404 etc
      // so check the status
      if (req.status == 200) {
        // Resolve the promise with the response text
        resolve(req.response);
      }
      else {
        // Otherwise reject with the status text
        // which will hopefully be a meaningful error
        reject(Error(req.statusText));
      }
    };

    // Handle network errors
    req.onerror = function() {
      reject(Error("Network Error"));
    };

    // Make the request
    req.send();
  });
}

Note: I also wrote an article about this.

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<html>
  <script>
    var xmlDoc = null ;

  function load() {
    if (typeof window.ActiveXObject != 'undefined' ) {
      xmlDoc = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
      xmlDoc.onreadystatechange = process ;
    }
    else {
      xmlDoc = new XMLHttpRequest();
      xmlDoc.onload = process ;
    }
    xmlDoc.open( "GET", "background.html", true );
    xmlDoc.send( null );
  }

  function process() {
    if ( xmlDoc.readyState != 4 ) return ;
    document.getElementById("output").value = xmlDoc.responseText ;
  }

  function empty() {
    document.getElementById("output").value = '<empty>' ;
  }
</script>

<body>
  <textarea id="output" cols='70' rows='40'><empty></textarea>
  <br></br>
  <button onclick="load()">Load</button> &nbsp;
  <button onclick="empty()">Clear</button>
</body>
</html>
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HTML :

<!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <head>
    <script>
    function loadXMLDoc()
    {
    var xmlhttp;
    if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
      {// code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
      xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
      }
    else
      {// code for IE6, IE5
      xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
      }
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
      {
      if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
        {
        document.getElementById("myDiv").innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
        }
      }
    xmlhttp.open("GET","1.php?id=99freebies.blogspot.com",true);
    xmlhttp.send();
    }
    </script>
    </head>
    <body>

    <div id="myDiv"><h2>Let AJAX change this text</h2></div>
    <button type="button" onclick="loadXMLDoc()">Change Content</button>

    </body>
    </html>

PHP:

<?php

$id = $_GET[id];
print "$id";

?>
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This may help:

function doAjax(url, callback) {
    var xmlhttp = window.XMLHttpRequest ? new XMLHttpRequest() : new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200) {
            callback(xmlhttp.responseText);
        }
    }

    xmlhttp.open("GET", url, true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}
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