Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Let's say I have a path which looks like the following:

/A/B/C/DIRECTORY/D/E/F

Now, what I want to achieve using parameter substitution, is cutting of the part of the path after DIRECTORY, no matter where in the path the DIRECTORY is positioned (A, B, C, etc. just stand for random directory names).

After substitution:

/A/B/C/DIRECTORY

This is what I've tried so far:

#!/bin/bash

if [[ $# < 1 ]]
then
    echo "Usage: $0 DIRECTORY"
fi

CURRENT_DIRECTORY=$(pwd)
DIRECTORY=$1

cd ${CURRENT_DIRECTORY%!(DIRECTORY)/*}

Obviously, this doesn't work. I could implement this using awk or sed but I'm interested if it is possible using only parameter substitution.

share|improve this question

May be this can help -

[jaypal:~/Temp] D="A/B/C/DIRECTORY/D/E/F"

[jaypal:~/Temp] echo $D
A/B/C/DIRECTORY/D/E/F

[jaypal:~/Temp] c=${D%/*/*/*}

[jaypal:~/Temp] echo $c
A/B/C/DIRECTORY
share|improve this answer
[ghoti@pc ~]$ D="/A/B/C/foo/D/E"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ echo "${D/foo*/}"
/A/B/C/

of course, this isn't perfect:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ D="/A/B/C/foobar/D/foo/E"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ echo "${D/foo*/}"
/A/B/C/

Read the bash man page and search for "Pattern substitution".

share|improve this answer

Try next solution:

cd ${CURRENT_DIRECTORY/${DIRECTORY}*/""}

EDIT:

More accurate answer would be appending your directory after removing last part:

cd ${CURRENT_DIRECTORY/${DIRECTORY}*/""}$DIRECTORY
share|improve this answer

Thanks to Birei, I came to this (not perfect but good enough solution:

#/bin/bash

if [[ $# < 1 ]]
then
  echo "Usage: $0 BASENAME"
fi

echo ${PWD/%$1*/$1}

Example:

$ PWD=/home/ltorvalds/workspace
$ ./up.sh ltorvalds
/home/ltorvalds    
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.