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I am aware of the need to synchronize all inputs to an FPGA before using those inputs in order to avoid metastability. I'm also aware of the need to synchronize signals that cross clock domains within a single FPGA. This question isn't about crossing clock domains.

My question is whether it is a good idea to routinely register all of the inputs and outputs of every internal hardware module in an FPGA design. The rationale is that we want to break up long chains of combinational logic in order to improve the clock rate so that we can meet the timing constraints for a chosen clock rate. This will add additional cycles of latency proportional to the number of modules that a signal must cross. Is this a good idea or a bad idea? Should one register only inputs and not outputs?

Answer Summary

Rule of thumb: register all outputs of internal FPGA cores; no need to register inputs. If an output already comes from a register, such as the state register of a state machine, then there is no need to register again.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is difficult to give a hard and fast rule. It really depends on many factors.

It could:

  • Increase Fmax by breaking up combinatorial paths
  • Make place and route easier by allowing the tools to spread logic out in the part
  • Make partitioning your design easier, allowing for partial rebuilds.

It will not magically solve critical path timing issues. If there is a critical path inside one of your major "blocks", then it will still remain your critical path.

Additionally, you may encounter more problems, depending on how full your design is on the target part.

These things said, I lean to the side of registering outputs only.

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I spoke with someone who also gave the same advice of registering outputs only. –  Nathan Farrington Dec 19 '11 at 22:43
    
I generally partition modules so that datapath outputs are registers. Though this is certainly not a rule. –  user597225 Dec 19 '11 at 22:55

Another option you have is, to let the tools work for you. Add add the end of your complete system a bunch of registers (if you want to pipeline more) and activate in your synthesis tool retiming. This will move the registers (hopefully) between the logic where it is most useful.

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My question is whether it is a good idea to routinely register all of the inputs and outputs of every internal hardware module in an FPGA design.

No, it's not a good idea to routinely introduce registers like this.

  1. Doing both inputs and outputs is redundant. They'll be no logic between the output register and the next input register.
  2. If my block contains a single AND gate, it's overkill. It depends on the timing and design complexity.
  3. Register stages need to be properly thought about and designed. What happens when a output FIFO fills or other stall conditions? Do all signals have the right register delay so that they appear at the right stage in the right cycle? Adding registers isn't necessarily as simple as it seems.

The rationale is that we want to break up long chains of combinational logic in order to improve the clock rate so that we can meet the timing constraints for a chosen clock rate. This will add additional cycles of latency proportional to the number of modules that a signal must cross. Is this a good idea or a bad idea?

In this case it sounds like you must introduce registers, and you shouldn't read the previous points as "don't do it". Just don't do it blindly. Think about the control logic around the registers and the (now) multi-cycle nature of the logic. You are now building a "Pipeline". Being able to stall a pipeline properly when the output can't write is a huge source of bugs.

Think of cars moving on a road. If one car applies it's brakes and stops, all cars behind need to as well. If the first cars brake lights aren't working, the next car won't get the signal to brake, and it'll crash. Similarly each stage in a pipeline needs to tell the previous stage it's stopping for a moment.

What you can find is that instead of having long timing paths along your computation paths going from input to output, you end up with long timing paths on your enable controlling all these register stages from output to input.

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Registering all of the inputs and outputs of every internal hardware module in an FPGA design is a bit of overkill. If an output register feeds an input register with no logic between them, then 2x the required registers are consumed. Unless, of course, you're doing logic path balancing.

Registering only inputs and not outputs of every internal hardware module in an FPGA design is a conservative design approach. If the design meets its performance and resource utilization requirements, then this is a valid approach.

If the design is not meeting its performance/utilization requirements, then you've got to do the extra timing analysis in order to reduce the registers in a given logic path within the FPGA.

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What about registering just outputs and not inputs? –  Nathan Farrington Dec 19 '11 at 22:18
    
As long as the FPGA pin inputs are registered, then registering internal module outputs instead of internal module inputs does not matter. –  David Pointer Dec 19 '11 at 22:31

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