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I have embedded C code which I'm unit testing with a C++ framework. C and C++ handle inline functions differently, so when I want to create inline functions which are used in two source files, I do this:

In a header file:

#ifdef __cplusplus
# define INLINE inline
#else
# ifndef INLINE
#  define INLINE extern inline
# endif
#endif

INLINE Uint8 my_inline_function( Uint8 stuff )
{
    return stuff;  // not really, but it's not germane to the example
}

In exactly one of the two .c files:

#define INLINE

Now both C and C++ compilers are satisfied, but when I build, I get this warning:

In file included from ../MyFile.c:28:0,
             from utest_MyFile.cpp:10:
../MyFile.h:53:0: warning: "INLINE" redefined
../MyFile.c:26:0: note: this is the location of the previous definition

Is there a way I can silence this warning?

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3  
Why do you redefine the macro in the .c files? –  evnu Dec 19 '11 at 21:46
2  
It's a really bad idea to #include a C source file from a C++ source file in any case. You can't expect C source code to be valid C++ source code or have the same meaning even if it is. The different meanings of inline is just one instance of the problem. –  Charles Bailey Dec 19 '11 at 21:50
    
The thing is, I need to redefine INLINE, so conditionally not redefining it defeats the purpose. The reason the unit test files #include the .c files they test is so they'll have access to the static functions and variables, essentially making it an extension of the code it tests without polluting the deliverable code. If the unit tests only #inlude the header file, they won't be able to unit test those private functions. –  jasper77 Dec 19 '11 at 22:11
    
@envu, C wants inline functions to be defined in a source file and externed in a header file, or else it gets defined in each translation unit that includes that header file and attempting to link causes multiple definitions. Redefining the macro in the .c file accomplishes defining the functions in the .c and declaring in the .c for C, and defining in the .h for C++. –  jasper77 Dec 19 '11 at 22:14

6 Answers 6

Use #ifndef

#ifndef INLINE
# ifdef __cplusplus
#  define INLINE inline
# else
#  define INLINE extern inline
# endif
#endif
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You're probably including the define multiple times in the same translation unit. You can add include guards:

#ifndef INLINE_DEFINED
#define INLINE_DEFINED

#ifdef __cplusplus
# define INLINE inline
#else
# ifndef INLINE
#  define INLINE extern inline
# endif
#endif

//...
#endif

or undefine the directive:

#undef INLINE

#ifdef __cplusplus
# define INLINE inline
#else
# ifndef INLINE
#  define INLINE extern inline
# endif
#endif

A harder approach would be to just silence the warning:

#pragma warning( disable : /*warning number*/ )

Not sure if this is cross-platform though.

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First as Charles says in his comment, you shouldn't do this, C and C++ are substantially different languages. In particular their rules for inline functions are different. It will cause you pain.

Then, you have another design flaw. This is apparent since you are trying to redefine a macro. You have two different contexts for your INLINE so these represent two different things. I think the following model is much easier and direct:

  • use inline for the header files. no macro or stuff like that and no extern
  • in one C or C++ file place an "instantiation" for the same function

you should decide if your instantiation is C or C++, don't play games here. In C such an instantiation is

extern inline Uint8 my_inline_function( Uint8 stuff );

(C doesn't call that instantiation but let's just use the same term as C++)

in C++ it would be

Uint8 my_inline_function( Uint8 stuff );

That's it, no need for magic:

  • all compilation units that include the header file will have a definition available
  • for all situations where you'd still need the linker symbol the one instantiation will be used

Edit:

Seeing your comment (which doesn't convince me completely) I think you would be better off by just having one macro for the instantiation in a header file

#ifdef __cplusplus
# define INSTANT
#else
# define INSTANT extern inline
#endif

and then in one .c or .C or whatever you will need to convince the compiler

INSTANT Uint8 my_inline_function( Uint8 stuff );
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You are correct, of course, but we like using a C++ compiler for unit testing because the stricter type checking catches more potential problems. Yes there's pain but we find it worthwhile. Given that situation, this approach would require me to have both types of instantiations within conditional preprocessor directives. –  jasper77 Dec 19 '11 at 22:37
    
@jasper77, please see my edit. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 19 '11 at 22:50
1  
@jasper77, this will result in bad code for both languages. E.g you will not be able to use local static variables. With the recent changes auto will have two completely different meanings, and so on. And it is not worth much that trouble. If you stick to the intersection of the two languages (which you must), the stricter type checking of C++ is a myth. The only real difference here is conversion to void*, which you should avoid anyhow. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 19 '11 at 22:57

You should have the #define INLINE... in its own header file with its own header guard:

(inline.h)

#ifndef INLINE_DEFINED

#ifdef __cplusplus
# define INLINE inline
#else
# ifndef INLINE
#  define INLINE extern inline
# endif
#endif

#endif

You should then put #include "inline.h" near the top of any file that needs it.

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I appreciate the advice to avoid combining C and C++, but we feel the benefits of stricter type checking and simpler-to-use unit test frameworks outweigh these hiccups. Given that, the approach I find cleanest is in the .c file replacing

#define INLINE

with

#ifndef __cplusplus
# define INLINE
#endif
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I suspect that this is what causing the problem

#ifdef __cplusplus
# define INLINE inline

Try to change this to

#ifdef __cplusplus
# ifndef INLINE
# define INLINE inline
#endif
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