Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on cleaning up some adopted code - there is a lot of duplication.

There is a set of jQuery callbacks where we get back JSON like this:

[
{"location":{"id":164,"name":"place 1"},"users":[{"id":1,"name":"joe"},{"id":2,"name":"jack"}]},
{"location":{"id":162,"name":"place 2"},"users":[{"id":3,"name":"joe"},{"id":4,"name":"jon"}]}
]

I go through with these functions:

function locations_view(r) {
    str = "";

    $.each(r.data, function(k, v) {
        str += v.location.name + "<br />";
        iterate_users(v.users);
    });

    $("#locations").html(str);
} 

function iterate_users(users) {
    str += '<strong>users:</strong>' + users.length + '<br />';

    $.each(users, function(k1, v1) {
        str += "<a href='/users/" + v1.id + "'>" + v1.name + "</a> ";   
    });

    str += "<br />";
}

This seems to work but it looks a little ugly. Is there a better way to do this. Also, I want to minimize memory consumption (returning the string rather than have a global str was causing performance issues). Is there a better, more elegant way to do this? Would having multiple copies of str ever cause a problem? Like if I have products_view that also uses a str?

share|improve this question
    
using globals is always discouraged. i dont know why it would cause a big performance change... –  Evan Dec 19 '11 at 22:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, if something else uses str in the wrong way (i.e. also globally) then that will cause a problem. Best not to have any globals at all. You could change them to this:

function locations_view(r) {
    var str = "";

    $.each(r.data, function(k, v) {
        str += v.location.name + "<br />";
        str += iterate_users(v.users);
    });

    $("#locations").html(str);
} 

function iterate_users(users) {
    var str = '<strong>users:</strong>' + users.length + '<br />';

    $.each(users, function(k1, v1) {
        str += "<a href='/users/" + v1.id + "'>" + v1.name + "</a> ";   
    });

    return str + "<br />";
}

And that would be much better. If there are other functions that use iterate_users, they'll need to be changed too.

Also, if you're not already doing this, consider escaping the HTML in v1.name to prevent script injection. You could also use jQuery/DOM manipulation instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I would think the str problem would happen but I reloaded like 20 times and wasn't able to get it to do that. Just one example but curious if javascript engine is able to manage that correctly. Intuitively, I would agree with you. In original question, I was getting problems due to passing the str as an argument. –  timpone Dec 19 '11 at 22:53

It might be a bit faster doing concatenation in one step, like

function locations_view(r) {
    var peices = [], br = "<br />";

    $.each(r.data, function(k, v) {
        peices.push(v.location.name, br);
        peices.push.apply(peices, iterate_users(v.users));
    });

    $("#locations").html(peices.join(""));
}
share|improve this answer

I've cleaned up your code:

function locations_view(r){
    var str = ""; // don't forget var
    $.each(r.data, function(k,v){
        str += v.location.name + "<br />";
        str += iterate_users(v.users);  // iterate_users now returns a string, concat it
    });
    $("#locations").html(str);
} 

function iterate_users(users){
    var str = '<strong>users:</strong>' + users.length + '<br />'; // redefine str locally
    $.each(users, function (k1,v1){
        str += '<a href="/users/' + v1.id + '">' + v1.name + '</a> '; // flipped use of ' and ", it's more correct
    });
    return str + "<br />"; // return str
}

I don't see much wrong with it. I suppose there might be more efficient ways to do it, buy why? This seems like a decent and most importantly: obvious way to do it.

Also, JSLint, it will hurt your feelings but save you headaches

share|improve this answer
function locations_view(r) {

    var $loc = $("#locations");

    $.each(r.data, function (k, v) {

        $loc.append(v.location.name + "<br/>");
        $loc.append('<strong>users:</strong>' + v.users.length + '<br />');
        $.each(v.users, function (k1, v1) {
           $loc.append("<a href='/users/" + v1.id + "'>" + v1.name + "</a> ");
        });
        $loc.append("<br />");

    });
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.