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I'm looking to implement a bubble sort. I have the following code that I wrote, which uses a for loop inside of a do loop. How can I make this into a bubble sort that uses two for loops?

Here's my code:

do {
    switched = false;
    for (int i = 1; i < size; i++) {
        if (a[i] < a[i-1]) {
            int temp = a[i];
            a[i] = a[i-1];
            a[i-1] = temp;
            switched = true;
        }
    }
} while (switched);

(This is tagged homework, but this is studying for the final exam, not actual homework.)

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5  
"I'm looking to implement a bubble sort" - there's your problem! (Seriously, why do they continue to insist on teaching the use of Bubblesort....) –  Mitch Wheat Dec 19 '11 at 23:09
1  
@MitchWheat, implementing bubblesort is just starters for teaching sorting...and it helps you appreciate other sorting techniques. –  Jonathan M Dec 19 '11 at 23:12
2  
Shouldn't you be starting at zero? –  Don Roby Dec 19 '11 at 23:12
5  
@glowcoder: I don't think the JVM complains much about C++ code. –  Mooing Duck Dec 19 '11 at 23:19
2  
@DeadMG Yes, yes, as I said it appeared to be a Java question at first glance. :-) I got up super early this morning to work with international clients :-( I'm gonna blame it on that! Wow. Why the hate? :( –  corsiKa Dec 19 '11 at 23:41
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8 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because you know the last element in the list will always be sorted (since it bubbled up to the top) you can stop there.

for(int x = size; x >= 0; x--) {
    bool switched = false;
    for(int i = 1; i < x; i++) {
        if(blah) {
            // swap code here
            switched = true;
        }

    }
    if(!switched) break; // not the biggest fan of this but it gets the job done
}
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1  
This is the answer your prof is looking for. –  Jonathan M Dec 19 '11 at 23:17
    
If you don't like the break you could do i<x && !switched in the conditional. –  Jonathan M Dec 19 '11 at 23:19
    
@Jon Having graded CS101 homework before, yes I agree. This would be what the professor is most likely looking for, especially a small snippet about how 'most recently highest element' is always sorted. –  corsiKa Dec 19 '11 at 23:19
    
@Jon That's true. I like break much more than that. Doing that puts the variable outside of the loop and therefore in a scope larger than it needs to be. Functions tend to grow large enough as it is, we shouldn't give people more variables than they need. –  corsiKa Dec 19 '11 at 23:20
1  
Realize that the break is completely optional if you don't mind best case == worst case. Also wouldn't x > 1 work for the first loop? –  Mark Ransom Dec 19 '11 at 23:32
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A bit obligate, but hey, you asked for it:

for(bool switched=true; switched;)
{
    switched = false;
    for (int i = 1; i < size; i++) {
        if (a[i] < a[i-1]) {
            int temp = a[i];
            a[i] = a[i-1];
            a[i-1] = temp;
            switched = true;
        }
    }
}

Two for loops...

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2  
I don't want to upvote because... wow it's bad! At the same time, I don't want to downvote because it's 1) clever and 2) correct. Torn! –  corsiKa Dec 19 '11 at 23:16
2  
You should be reported for cruel treatment of a for statement! –  Mark Ransom Dec 19 '11 at 23:17
1  
@glowcoder: feel free to not vote. Comment much appreciated! I was torn between this snappy answer and a jabby comment :) –  sehe Dec 19 '11 at 23:17
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Since the maximum number of times your inner loop will run is size times, you know that the outer loop only can be bound by size.

for (int x = 0; x < size; x++ )
{
    switched = false;
    for (int i = 1; i < size; i++)
    {
        if (a[i] < a[i - 1])
        {
            int temp = a[i];
            a[i] = a[i - 1];
            a[i - 1] = temp;
            switched = true;
        }
    }

    if(switched)
    {
        break;
    }
}
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A simple improvement to bubble sort is to remember the last location where a swap occurred. After each pass the elements beyond that point are sorted. Next time through the loop only iterate up to the previous high water mark.

void bubble_sort(int *arr, int size)
{
    for (int hwm; size > 1; size = hwm)
    {
        hwm = 0;
        for (int i = 1; i < size; ++i)
        {
            if (arr[i] < arr[i-1])
            {
                std::swap(arr[i], arr[i-1]);
                hwm = i;
            }
        }
    }
}
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You can run the inside loop size times instead of checking switched, by having an outer loop for(int j=0; j<size; ++j). To make it slightly less badly inefficient you can make the inner loop 1 step shorter each time.

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The first full pass through the loop (that is, the first iteration of your outer do loop) is guaranteed to put the largest element in position a[size - 1]. (Do you see why?) The next full pass is guaranteed not to change that, and, in addition, to put the second-largest element in position a[size - 2]. (Again, do you see why?) And so on. So the first pass needs i to go from 1 to size - 1, but the second only needs i to go from 1 to size - 2, the third only needs i to go from 1 to size - 3, and so on. Overall, you need at most size - 1 passes (with the last pass just covering position 1 and comparing a[1] to a[0] to make sure the smallest element is in place).

So, your outer for-loop needs to vary max_i, initially set to size - 1 and ending up at 1, and your inner for-loop needs to vary i from 1 to max_i.

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Think about the maximum number of times the do loop can execute.

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A really silly method to use two for loops would be as follows:

for(bool switched=true;switched;)
{
    switched=false;
    for(int i=1; i<size; ++i)
    {
        if (a[i] < a[i-1]) 
        {
            int temp = a[i];
            a[i] = a[i-1];
            a[i-1] = temp;
            switched = true;
        }
    }
}

A more serious answer might be as below... but now that I think about it this probably is not bubble sort:

for(int i=0; i<(size-1); ++i)
{
    for(int j=(i+1); j<(size-1); ++j)
    {
        if(a[i]>a[j])
        {
            temp=a[i];
            a[i]=a[j];
            a[j]=temp;
        }
    }
}
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