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#include <stdio.h>

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
static struct item
{
    char code;
    float price;
}
table[] = 
{
    {'a', 3.29},
    {'b', 2.99},
    {'c', 0.59},
    {'d', 1.59},
    {'e', 2.39}
};

char item_code[2];
int quantity;
int i;

do {
    printf("Enter item code: ");
    scanf("%1s", item_code);

    if (*item_code != '.') {
        for (i=0; i< sizeof(table)/sizeof(struct item)
             && table[i].code != *item_code; i++);

        if (i < sizeof(table)/sizeof(struct item)) {
            printf("Enter quantity: ");
            scanf("%d", &quantity);
            printf("\nUnit price = %.2f, total price = %.2f.\n\n\n",
                   table[i].price, quantity * table[i].price);
        }
        else
            printf("\nItem code %c does not exist. \n\n\n", *item_code);
    }
} while (*item_code != '.');
printf("Thank you.\n");
return 0;
}

I am a newbie. I am unable to understand the second "for loop" in the above program. Why is sizeof being used? What exactly is the value of "i" each time the loop is executed? Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Let's examine some simple code in a system where integers are four bytes long:

int xyzzy[] = {3,1,4,1,5,9,2,6,5,3,5,8,9};       // 13 integers
printf ("%d\n"", sizeof(xyzzy));                 // 13 * 4 = 52
printf ("%d\n"", sizeof(int));                   //           4
printf ("%d\n"", sizeof(xyzzy) / sizeof(int));   // 52 / 4 = 13

Hence that calculation is a way to get the number of items in an array.

As an aside, I prefer the construct:

sizeof(xyzzy) / sizeof(*xyzzy)

since that will continue to work even if I change the type of xyzzy to double for example. It means I only need to change the one line where the variable is declared rather than hunting for all the size calculations as well.

In fact I even have a favorite macro for this:

#define numof(x) (sizeof(x) / sizeof(*x))

to make my code a little smaller.

In terms of what that for loop is doing exactly (and, by the way, it's not technically the second for loop since there's only one, but it is the second loop), it basically iterates through every value of i (staring at 0, the first index) until it reaches either the point beyond the last element or it finds an element with the desired item code.

On exit from that loop, i will be set to the number of elements if the item code wasn't found or set to the correct index if it was found, hence the if statement following that for loop.

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i starts at zero (i=0) and increases by one each iteration(i++). So, 0, 1, 2, 3... etc.

sizeof returns the size of its parameter in bytes. The sizeof(table)/sizeof(struct item) is the way to get the number of items in the table. Just like, "each city block is 200m. How many city blocks are there in 1000m street?" sizeof(street)/sizeof(block). Simple.

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paxdiablo's answer explains the situation perfectly; I'd like to caution you against your (possible) optimism about this feature of the language: arrays do not know their length. You can't use paxdiablo's useful macro on an array that has been passed to a function:

#define numof(x) (sizeof(x) / sizeof(*x))

void f(char arr[]) {
    int len;

    len = numof(arr);  /* FAIL */
}

void bar() {
    char c[] = "initialized char array";

    f(c);
}

A function prototype written type name[] actually decays to a type *name pointer. The worst part is that the use of numof() won't actually die, it'll just give you the wrong answer: sizeof(arr) / sizeof (*arr) is going to return 8 / 1 or 4 / 1 because it is checking the size of a char * against the size of a char.

paxdiablo's macro is useful for checking the size of an array defined in an enclosing scope but not for parameters.

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2  
Just one nitpick: arrays do know their length. It's the pointers that arrays decay to under many circumstances that don't know the length of the arrays whose first element they point to. But technically, they're no longer arrays in that case :-) –  paxdiablo Dec 20 '11 at 4:50
    
Well said, thanks. :) –  sarnold Dec 20 '11 at 6:12

"Why is sizeof being used?"

To understand why sizeof() is being used, you must first have a basic understanding of the structure and the variable it is used to define.

static struct item
{
    char code;
    float price;
}
table[] = 
{
    {'a', 3.29},
    {'b', 2.99},
    {'c', 0.59},
    {'d', 1.59},
    {'e', 2.39}
};

This declares a structure type called item which consists of two variables - code which has a type of char and price which has a type of float. Using the following statement:

sizeof(struct item)

Provides the size of the structure itself... a char, 1 byte and a float, 4 bytes.

The code then defines a struct item array called table[] and initializes it with multiple values. In this particular case there are five chars and five floats (for a total of 25 bytes). So, by taking the sizeof(table) and dividing it by the sizeof(struct item), we are given the total value of struct items in the array (25 / 5 = 5).

You may ask, why not just say i < 5 ? Afterall, you can see that there are five struct items in the table array. However, if this is a huge table you may not want to count the number of structures in the array. This also makes it much easier to maintain later on down the road.

What exactly is the value of "i" each time the loop is executed?

The first and last parts of the for(;;) loop provides the answer:

for (i = 0; 
     i < sizeof(table)/sizeof(struct item) && table[i].code != *item_code;
     i++);

So, i is initialized with the value 0. During each successive iteration through the loop, i is incremented by 1 (i++).

Therefore, i will continue to increase by 1 until one of the following boundaries has been reached:

i == 5                        //(sizeof(table) / sizeof(struct item))
table[i].code == *item_code

I hope this helps!

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The sizeof(table)/sizeof(struct item) evaluates to the size in bytes at compile-time which tells you the number of items in your table in your case i.e. sizeof(table) in bytes by the sizeof(struct item) is the number of items you have in your array which is 5.

You could also just write it as

for (i=0; i < 5 && table[i].code != *item_code; i++);
{
   // ........
}

The loop terminates when i becomes 5 or your condition table[i].code != *item_code evaluates to false.

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