Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am developing a faceted search system. Below the search box, there's a radio select widget that has the options:

O New search     O Within your results

When the page is loaded, new search should be selected by default, so I'm using the initial keyword for that.

The problem I have is that after a user selects New search and places a query, I want the default to be switched to Within your results, since most searches are refinements.

So what I need to do is change the value the user submitted, which is stored in a Django Form.

How can I change the value of the form field? Validation has already occurred, and from what I have gathered so far, request.GET is immutable (probably a good thing), and I can't change the Form either.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just an idea, instead of hacking the user input you could show that field only when you have a query parameter for the search.

This way the first time the user 'hit' the view he doesn't see the useless radio field.

e.g. here I would use the searching param during the __init__ of the form to set the field as hidden and with the right initial value ( you can also do something like DrTysa suggested and move the searching detection at form level looking at the data dict)

searching = False
if data.get('query'):
    searching = True
form = SearchForm(data, searching=searching)
share|improve this answer
    
This is more or less the route I'm taking. I forgot that the radio buttons shouldn't be shown initially. I'm not dealing with the hidden form though - if it's blank, I can imply that the user wants a new search. –  mlissner Dec 20 '11 at 20:55
add comment

The django recommended way to modify request.GET is to call the copy method.

mutable_get = request.GET.copy()
mutable_get['search'] = 'within_results'

You could also set the initial dynamically in the form __init__ or just by accessing the bound form field attributes.

form.fields['my_field'].initial = True

Which one works will depend on how you're building the forms.

share|improve this answer
add comment
class MyForm(forms.Form):
    def __init__(self, data, *args, **kwargs):
        if 'do_search' in data: # or any other way to find out if there is an existing search
            kwargs['initial'] = kwargs.setdefault('initial', {'your_radio': 'your_within_value'})
        super(MyForm, self).__init__(self, data, *args, **kwargs)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.