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Let's say I have a spreadsheet that has two columns of data. For example:

A    B
1    2
2    3
1    1
1    2
1    3
2    3
2    1 

How could I count the total number of times each pair appears in the spreadsheet. In the example above, 1-2 should have a count of 3 (1 for 2-1, 2 for 1-2), 2-3 should have a count of 2etc

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Note that for Excel versions >2007, you can use the new formula COUNTIFS:

[EDIT] Added the correct solution (credits to Chris Nielsen - see the comments)

=COUNTIFS($A$1:$A$12,A1,$B$1:$B$12,B1) + COUNTIFS($A$1:$A$12,B1,$B$1:$B$12,A1)
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+1 offers a significant speed advantage over SUMPRODUCT in xl07 and xl0 –  brettdj Dec 20 '11 at 9:50
2  
Fails to satisfy the criteria that order is not important. See example where 1-2 count should be 3. Change to =COUNTIFS($A$1:$A$12,A1,$B$1:$B$12,B1)+COUNTIFS($A$1:$A$12,B1,$B$1:$B$12,A1) to get correct count –  chris neilsen Dec 20 '11 at 21:59
    
Agree with Brett, will be faster. –  Jesse Dec 20 '11 at 22:31
    
@chrisneilsen good pick up Chris. I had focussed on the technique rather than the actual solution –  brettdj Dec 21 '11 at 0:20
    
@chrisneilsen: thanks. I missed that point in the OP's example –  JMax Dec 21 '11 at 7:23

One way would be to use a SUMPROUDUCT in column C. That would give you a count of the number of times the combination in that row is encountered.

=SUMPRODUCT(--($A$1:$A$7=A1),--($B$1:$B$7=B1))+SUMPRODUCT(--($A$1:$A$7=B1),--($B$1:$B$7=A1))

Following your example this would output:

A   B   C
1   2   3
2   3   2
1   1   1
1   2   3
1   3   1
2   3   2
2   1   3

SUMPRODUCT can be tricky, you can read some good howtos here:

http://chandoo.org/wp/2009/11/10/excel-sumproduct-formula/

Jesse

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Fails to satisfy the criteria that order is not important. See example where 1-2 count should be 3. –  chris neilsen Dec 20 '11 at 21:59
    
Updated to account for order criteria. –  Jesse Dec 20 '11 at 22:30

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