Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I need a pointer to member of class, I do as following

struct MyStruct
{
    int foo();
};

int (MyStruct::*p)() = &MyStruct::foo;

My question is why do I need to use & operator to take the address which may be ignored if it were a static function. Also, I've heard pointer to members aren't really a pointer, Can someone clarify that?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If it's a static function, it works just as a regular non-member function pointer: the function name itself can be implicitly converted to a function pointer.

If it's a non-static member function, it's no longer the same thing as a non-member function:

  1. It has a hidden this parameter;
  2. In a multiple inheritance scenario, converting a pointer to one of the base classes may produce a pointer to a different address. This means that if the member function is inherited, the this pointer may need to be adjusted before the call. This already makes it impossible to use a pointer to store a pointer-to-member-function.

Raymond Chen wrote an interesting article about this with more details and examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Agree.And the address of non-member function pointer can be resolved in compile time. However, for member function pointer, its address will be resolved in run time, for example, the virtual function. So it can't use single address to present the pointer-to-member-function –  RolandXu Dec 20 '11 at 6:46

why do I need to use & operator to take the address which may be ignored if it were a static function

You are right, in the case of pointer to member function syntax ideally & can be omitted. I think, & syntax is there may be due to historical convention.

I've heard pointer to members aren't really a pointer, Can someone clarify that?

That's not correct. The only difference is that they are pointer to member function. Since, class non-static member contain an implicit this pointer as their argument, they have a special signature. Also, they are not inter-convertible with normal function pointer with same signature.

In your code example, theoritically p is pointing to:

int MyStruct::foo (MyStruct* const);
share|improve this answer
2  
static_assert(!std::is_pointer<int (MyStruct::*)()>::value, "A pointer to member function is not a pointer");. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 20 '11 at 6:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.