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I currently have 2 C-programs and 1 header file that I have to make into a Makefile. I am new to compiling programs into Makefiles but I know the basics. I type in:

cc -c file1.c

cc -c file2.c

cc file1.o file2.o

----- I get the following error -----

file2.o: In function 'method':

file2.c:(.text+0x0): multiple definition of 'method'

file1.o:file1.c:(.text+0x0): first defined here

collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

What is the problem? I heard various things like because they share the same header ('method' is defined in the header file) that the compiler thinks there is two of them. I don't know. What do you guys think?

Thank you,

EDIT: Thank you for the responses. What if 'method' is a "struct" function? Would it still be a good idea to just move it to somewhere else? I just tried it and now I'm getting a "dereferencing pointer to incomplete type".

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I got it. Thank you everybody! –  Ellea Dec 20 '11 at 7:03

5 Answers 5

'method' is defined in the header file.

You should not be doing that. If you do that the function definition will go into all the files that include the header which causes linking errors as there will be multiple versions of the method.

You need to only declare the method in a header file. Define it in a .c file, compile it and link it to the object file from where this function is getting called.

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You have definition for method in both file2.c and file1.c . Try to only put declaration in common header files and move definition to only one c file.

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If method is a small function defined in a header file, you should declare it static inline e.g. like

/// in header.h
static inline int sum(int x, int y) { return x+y; }
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Declare the function as static function.

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Make your header file like this (the ifndef is to make sure it doesnt get included more than once):

#ifndef MYHEADER_H_
#define MYHEADER_H_

extern void mymethod1(void); // only put declaration in headers
extern void mymethod2(void);
... other stuff

#endif
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It's not valid to define macros in your program containing a double underscore. –  Charles Bailey Dec 20 '11 at 6:57
    
@Charles: I'm assuming your talking about how double underscores are reserved for predefined macros? –  Jesse Good Dec 20 '11 at 7:02
    
Not necessarily for macros but as any identifier, they are reserved for the implementation in all scopes. –  Charles Bailey Dec 20 '11 at 7:06
    
@Charles: Right, thanks for pointing that out, as a lot of old C code uses this way, I often fall into bad habit (Ill edit my answer). –  Jesse Good Dec 20 '11 at 7:08

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