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I have the following code.

        try
        {
            if (vm.SubmitAction == "Cancel")
                return RedirectToAction("ShowSummary", new
                {
                    ds = vm.Meta.DataSourceID
                 });  <------------------------------------------- xxxx
            _account.ValidateNoDuplicate(vm.Account);
            vm.Account.Modified = DateTime.Now;
            vm.Account.ModifiedBy = User.Identity.Name;
            _account.AddOrUpdate(vm.Account);
        }
        catch (Exception e) { 
            log(e); return View("CreateEdit", vm); 
        }
        return RedirectToAction("ShowSummary", new {
            ds = vm.Meta.DataSourceID
        });

If the user hits the cancel button then I have code ( Marked here with <-- xxxx ) that redirects to an action. This code is the same as the code after the try block. Is there a way that I can make my code exit from the try. The only way I can think of is to trigger an exception and I want a clean jump and not one that uses the exception as it's not an error for a user to click cancel.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by cleanly exit? The code is returning the result of a method call. Unless the method call exceptions, the code will be exited from the try block via return after the execution of the call. – Quintin Robinson Dec 20 '11 at 6:48
    
This code also smells in three other ways: 1) DateTime.Now uses local time, you most likely should use UTC since the variable identifies a point in time. i.e. DateTime.UtcNow. 2) It should be a service or parameter to the method. It's static and it changes, a bad combination. 3) You have a catch-all. You usually catch specific exceptions locally, and general exceptions in some top level handler. – CodesInChaos Dec 20 '11 at 10:36
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Switch the if block condition around:

// happens only when not cancelled
if (vm.SubmitAction != "Cancel") 
  try {
     _account.ValidateNoDuplicate(vm.Account);
     vm.Account.Modified = DateTime.Now;
     vm.Account.ModifiedBy = User.Identity.Name;
     _account.AddOrUpdate(vm.Account); 
   }
   catch (Exception e) { 
       log(e); return View("CreateEdit", vm); 
   }

// happens always
return RedirectToAction("ShowSummary", new {
       ds = vm.Meta.DataSourceID
});
share|improve this answer
    
This has a very subtle change in behavior. In the original code, if vm was null, the NullReferenceException would be caught. In this code, it won't be. Just pointing this out to the OP. Might want to change the condition to test for null first. – Amy Dec 20 '11 at 9:22
2  
@Inuyasha: Null reference exceptions should never be caught, so this version is better. A null reference exception should never be caught because a null reference exception should never be thrown; every null reference exception is a bug you should fix to make it impossible, not an exception you should catch. – Eric Lippert Dec 20 '11 at 16:54
    
@Eric - in this context I think that you're right, but I think that your statement is too strongly worded if applied more broadly. Sometimes you may be relying on buggy 3rd party code (where you are powerless to fix the bug), so catching a NRE may be the best of a bad set of options. – kvb Dec 20 '11 at 18:15

There is a way to exit a try catch manually (with a goto statement) but that's a terrible OO practice and should be avoided.

Encapsulate your RedirectToAction logic into a method and call it:

try
{
    if (vm.SubmitAction == "Cancel")
        return ShowSummary(vm);
    _account.ValidateNoDuplicate(vm.Account);
    vm.Account.Modified = DateTime.Now;
    vm.Account.ModifiedBy = User.Identity.Name;
    _account.AddOrUpdate(vm.Account);
}
catch (Exception e) { 
    log(e); 
    return View("CreateEdit", vm); 
}
return ShowSummary(vm);

And the method:

private ActionResult ShowSummary(MyViewModel vm)
{
    return RedirectToAction("ShowSummary", new
           {
               ds = vm.Meta.DataSourceID
           });  
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can exit a try block using a goto statement. See OmarQa's answer. – Amy Dec 20 '11 at 9:27
    
Let's just say that I prefer to ignore it. Btw the question mentions the "clean" way. Thank for the update. – Stéphane Bebrone Dec 20 '11 at 9:54
    
Preferring to ignore it is different than saying it doesn't exist. It does exist. It's doing the OP a disservice to tell him something that is false. – Amy Dec 20 '11 at 9:57
    
Update my post to reflect your comment. – Stéphane Bebrone Dec 20 '11 at 10:25

I know it is not the best programming keyword but goto do the job

try
    {
        if (vm.SubmitAction == "Cancel")
            goto ShowSummary;

        _account.ValidateNoDuplicate(vm.Account);
        vm.Account.Modified = DateTime.Now;
        vm.Account.ModifiedBy = User.Identity.Name;
        _account.AddOrUpdate(vm.Account);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        log(e); return View("CreateEdit", vm);
    }
ShowSummary:
    return RedirectToAction("ShowSummary", new
        {
            ds = vm.Meta.DataSourceID
        });
share|improve this answer

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