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int x = 12;

12 is said to be integer literal, and therefore can't be used in the LValue.

  1. How does the compiler allocate memory to a literals?
  2. What is the scope of a literals?
  3. Why can't we get its address with an &12 in its scope?
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7  
Err, 12 isn't an object at all, nor is x. You may want to choose a better example like a real object. –  paxdiablo Dec 20 '11 at 6:59
3  
It's an integral literal - see skjaidev's answer. –  paxdiablo Dec 20 '11 at 7:06
8  
x does name an object under the C++ object model. It's created by a definition, it has a storage duration, and it has a type. See § 1.8 The C++ object model in the C++11 standard. In the question it's clear that the term 'object' is being used in this sense, and not in the sense of an object in object oriented programing. –  bames53 Dec 20 '11 at 7:17
4  
@paxdiablo the relevant quote is §1.8.1 "The constructs in a C++ program create, destroy, refer to, access, and manipulate objects. An object is a region of storage." –  Seth Carnegie Dec 20 '11 at 7:20
3  
@AnishaKaul: int is a type, not a class. In C, there's no such thing as a class; in C++, a class type is an aggregate type declared using struct, class or union. –  Mike Seymour Dec 20 '11 at 11:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

OK Bad example in the question.
But the question is still valid:
Lets try:

Foo getFoo() {return Foo();}

int func()
{
    getFoo().bar();   // Creates temporary.
    // before this comment it is also destroyed.
    // But it lives for the whole expression above
    // So you can call bar() on it.
}

int func2()
{
    Foo const& tmp = getFoo();  // Creates temporary.
                                // Does not die here as it is bound to a const reference.

    DO STUFF
}  // tmp goes out of scope and temporary object destroyed.
   // It lives to here because it is bound to a const reference.

How does the compiler allocate memory to a temporary object?

Undefined up-to the compiler.
But it would be real easy to allocate a tiny bit more memory onto the stack frame and hold it there. Then destroy it and reduce the size of the stack frame (though this answer makes a whole lot of assumptions about the underlying hardware that you should never do (best just to think of it as the compiler doing magic)).

What is the scope of a temporary object?

The temporary object lives until the end of the expression (usually the ;) unless it is bound to a const reference. If it is bound to a const reference then it lives to then end of the scope that the reference belongs too (with a few exceptions (like constructors)).

Why can't we get its address with an &12 in its scope?

In the question 12 is not a temporay object.
It is an integer literal.

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Loki, A helpful answer, thanks. @skjaidev and Loki, BTW, is there some special reason that the compiler stores 12 in the object file rather than in the RAM? –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 20 '11 at 7:48
1  
@AnishaKaul: 12 is an integer literal it is probably not stored anywhere (it is part of the code). The variable x is region of storage (an object) and thus is addressable, weather this mean RAM or not is completely undefined. Your problem is that you are thinking in terms of particular hardware requirements. The standard deliberately tries to avoid hardware specifics (like the concept of RAM). The variable x only needs to have a physical address if its address is used; it may just live in a register (but this is digressing into hardware specifics that are not addressed in the standard). –  Loki Astari Dec 20 '11 at 7:51
    
12 is an integer literal it is probably not stored anywhere Perhaps that's the reason we get an error if we directly write 12 instead of assigning it to something. So, literals like 12 don't get stored anywhere is the answer? So does this mean that 12 doesn't get written to the object file, but the value of the variable which holds 12 gets? –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 20 '11 at 7:55
2  
@AnishaKaul: int main() {12;} compiles fine. As 12 is a literal thus a valid expression which is a valid statement. Mind you it does not do much. The literal 12 is probably encoded into an assembly instruction in an object file. The variable x in your is an object that exists (probably in memory). –  Loki Astari Dec 20 '11 at 8:12
2  
The standard deliberately does not specify anything like this (It attempts to be very hardware agnostic). Thus this is all dependent on the compiler. –  Loki Astari Dec 20 '11 at 8:40

In your example 12 is an integer literal. Integer literals are almost always "embedded" in machine instructions as an immediate operand. They are not stored in memory hence you can't access it through and address nor do they have a scope.

int x = 12 

would translate to something like

movl 12 address_of_x_or_register

in almost all architectures. Here 12 is encoded as part of the instruction.

Just to be clear, x still resides in the memory (stack in case of local variables or the data segment in case of global-variables) and would eventually contains the value 12. The RHS "object" 12 is the integer literal and it doesn't reside in memory before or during the instruction, but "resides" in the instruction itself.

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So, during compilation what does the compiler do to it? Storage? –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 20 '11 at 7:04
    
@skjaidev what does BSS stand for? Something-something-section I would guess –  Seth Carnegie Dec 20 '11 at 7:12
1  
Compiler uses the value directly in the machine instruction, this is just for integers though. String literals, for instance are assigned storage in the data segment. –  jman Dec 20 '11 at 7:14
    
@skjaidev You mean to say that the compiler at the time of actual "compilation" of the code, directly places 12 in the resultant object file? 12 is NOT placed in RAM? –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 20 '11 at 7:21
2  
Just to be clear, x still resides in the memory (stack in case of local variables or the data segment in case of global-segments) and contains the value 12 after the instruction executes. The RHS value 12 doesn't reside in memory before / during the instruction, but resides in the instruction itself. –  jman Dec 20 '11 at 7:29

1. How does the compiler allocate memory to a temporary object?

string myString = "hello";

In this case, a conversion constructor is called to initialize a new object.

2. What is the scope of a temporary object?

The life of the temporary object is until the semi-colon

3. Why can't we get its address with an &12 in its scope? (in this case "hello")

&12 is not an object, it is the parameter given to the conversion constructor

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&12 is not an object, it is the parameter given to the conversion constructor Why can't we get the address of 12 with an &12 is the question? –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 20 '11 at 7:39
    
and what is a "conversion constructor"? –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 20 '11 at 7:39
    
This link would be helpful to understand "conversion constructor" publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/lnxpcomp/v8v101/… –  Sanish Dec 20 '11 at 7:43
1  
See this SO question, why you can't take the address of a numeric literal stackoverflow.com/questions/1166378/… –  Sanish Dec 20 '11 at 7:46
    
Thanks +1 Sanish for the links. :) –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 20 '11 at 7:49

So, during compilation what does the compiler do to it? Storage?

This is really difficult to answer. The compiler will optomize the code as much as possible (the amount or level of optomization performed can often be set in your compiler tool).

For an example like the one given, if x can be substituted in the assembly instructions by 12, then x is "optomized out" and 12 is used as a direct replacement for x.

The "volatile" keyword can be used to trick the compiler into checking x every time it is used in the code. This will generate larger programs but might be useful to help you assign a memory location (storage) for your variable.

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Object is "something in memory". It means that this something occupies part of the process address space (either in stack or in 'free' memory). Also it means that you can get an address of it if you want to.

Temporary objects are just objects. Compiler generates the code to create them if it need such objects to calculate an expression:

void f(const string&);

void g()
{
     f(string("Hello"));
}

The expression which calls f() will lead to generation of code which:

  • creates temporary string object. Constructor is called with const char* as parameter;
  • calls f() with a reference to this temporary object as parameter;
  • destroys temporary string object.

The key part of this is the destruction of temporary object at the end of expression evaluation. Temporary object only exists in the expression itself (that is their makeshift scope). You may try something like: const string* ps = &string("Hello") but your compiler will probably sound an alarm, because such expression will lead to creation of pointer which references memory that was occupied with temporary object but is not occupied by it anymore. It may still contain the string object members or may be overwritten by the following expressions in a program (not to mention that the destruction of temporary object will free the memory allocated in heap by the object). Using ps will lead to undefined behavior.

The other question that arises here is the nature of objects in an expression like int x = 12. In this case x may be an object or may be not. That depends on the compiler settings and on the code following the line. Compiler may deside to place x in register. In such case x will not be an object, cause registers have no addresses (on most platforms at least). If you don't change the value of x compiler may even deside to use 12 in instructions directly. So '12' will only exists as a part of instruction codes.

Anyway, no matter what happens in the following code, int x = 12 will not create temporary 12 object. If compiler desides to place 12 in memory the instruction will be like (pseudo code):

store immediate address_of_x, 12

In case of an x plased in register you will have:

move immediate regX, 12

In both cases, 12 will be a part of the instruction (of compiled code chunk). Thus it will not be a separate object.

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"Temporary object only exists in the expression itself (that is their makeshift scope)." temporary objects are unnamed, hence they don't have any associated scope –  curiousguy Dec 21 '11 at 10:52
    
@curiousguy Thats why I called it makeshift scope. Temporary object exist while the expression is being evaluated. Similarly named object exist while program stays in its scope. –  Pavel Zhuravlev Dec 22 '11 at 1:22

Be careful, as other answers mostly cleared your misconceptions, but not this one:

What is the scope of a literals?

This question makes no sense, as the scope is a property of names (variables names, functions names, types names, templates names, namespaces names...).

A literal is a notation for a number, not a name.

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