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First, I have a very simple java bean which can be easily serialized to json:

class Node {
    private String text;
    // getter and setter
}

Node node = new Node();
node.setText("Hello");

String json = new Gson().toJson(node);
// json is { text: "Hello" }

Then in order to make such beans have some dynamic values, so I create a "WithData" base class:

Class WithData {
    private Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap<String, Object>();
    public void setData(String key, Object value) { map.put(key, value); }
    public Object getData(String key) = { return map.get(key); }
}

class Node extends WithData {
    private String text;
    // getter and setter
}

Now I can set more data to a node:

Node node = new Node();
node.setText("Hello");
node.setData("to", "The world");

But Gson will ignore the "to", the result is still { text: "Hello" }. I expect it to be: { text: "Hello", to: "The world" }

Is there any way to write a serializer for type WithData, that all classes extend it will not only generate its own properties to json, but also the data in the map?

I tried to implement a custom serializer, but failed, because I don't know how to let Gson serialize the properties first, then the data in map.

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Did you try making your Map field public? –  Tomislav Markovski Dec 20 '11 at 8:33
    
That won't help, I hope the keys of map will be the keys of json –  Freewind Dec 20 '11 at 8:37
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What I do now is creating a custom serializer:

public static class NodeSerializer implements JsonSerializer<Node> {
    public JsonElement serialize(Node src,
            Type typeOfSrc, JsonSerializationContext context) {
        JsonObject obj = new JsonObject();
        obj.addProperty("id", src.id);
        obj.addProperty("text", src.text);
        obj.addProperty("leaf", src.leaf);
        obj.addProperty("level", src.level);
        obj.addProperty("parentId", src.parentId);
        obj.addProperty("order", src.order);
        Set<String> keys = src.getDataKeys();
        if (keys != null) {
            for (String key : keys) {
                obj.add(key, context.serialize(src.getData(key)));
            }
        }
        return obj;
    };
}

Then use GsonBuilder to convert it:

Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().
    registerTypeAdapter(Node.class, new NodeSerializer()).create();

Tree tree = new Tree();
tree.addNode(node1);
tree.addNode(node2);

gson.toJson(tree);

Then the nodes in the tree will be converted as I expected. The only boring thing is that I need to create a special Gson each time.

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Actually, you should expect Node:WithData to serialize as

{
  "text": "Hello",
  "map": {
    "to": "the world"
  }
}

(that's with "pretty print" turned on)

I was able to get that serialization when I tried your example. Here is my exact code

import com.google.gson.Gson;
import com.google.gson.GsonBuilder;

import java.net.MalformedURLException;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;


public class Class1 {

  public static void main(String[] args) throws MalformedURLException {
    GsonBuilder gb = new GsonBuilder();
    Gson g = gb.setPrettyPrinting().create();

    Node n = new Node();
    n.setText("Hello");
    n.setData("to", "the world");

    System.out.println(g.toJson(n));
  }
  private static class WithData {
    private Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap<String, Object>();
    public void setData(String key, Object value) { map.put(key, value); }
    public Object getData(String key) { return map.get(key); }
  }
  private static class Node extends WithData {
    private String text;
    public Node() { }
    public String getText() {return text;}
    public void setText(String text) {this.text = text;}
  }
}

I was using the JDK (javac) to compile - that is important because other compilers (those included with some IDEs) may remove the information on which Gson relies as part of their optimization or obfuscation process.

Here are the compilation and execution commands I used:

"C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_24\bin\javac.exe" -classpath gson-2.0.jar Class1.java

"C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.6.0_24\bin\java.exe" -classpath .;gson-2.0.jar Class1

For the purposes of this test, I put the Gson jar file in the same folder as the test class file.

Note that I'm using Gson 2.0; 1.x may behave differently.

Your JDK may be installed in a different location than mine, so if you use those commands, be sure to adjust the path to your JDK as appropriate.

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