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I have a networking question. I've setup my own server. The server is up and running. But I must give people inside my network the server's local IP address for better downspeed, because when my network clients using internet, the server's upspeed is slow.

I think giving ip address to my users is pretty odd and hard to remember. Is there any way to allow a same domain name access the server, where the LAN users access via local ip address (ex: 192.168.1.99) and internet users via a static ip address (ex: 111.111.111.111), but with same domain name?

I've made a flow chart, if you don't fully understand my question.

Image

Users on local network and on the internet type the same domain: example.com

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Do you have control over the DNS server ? If so, you set up split dns, so it responds differently to queries on 192.166.x.y –  nos Dec 20 '11 at 8:31
    
@nos Oh, do you mean that i must setup a dns server too? –  Dimas Ahmad Eka Putra Dec 20 '11 at 9:10
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yes, that's how people can use a hostname instead of an IP address to reach your server. –  nos Dec 20 '11 at 9:17
    
@nos my server built with dns server too, with ubuntu package. I have full access with the dns. My purchased domain dns' on the registrar pointing to my server. –  Dimas Ahmad Eka Putra Dec 20 '11 at 12:23
    
I've googled split DNS. So I must have 2 DNS server on my LAN? Whether it should be separated between the DNS servers and the web-mail-ftp server? –  Dimas Ahmad Eka Putra Dec 20 '11 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

If you can recognise 100%, wheter a user is internal or external (e.g. set up a list with internal user accounts), you can use only the internet site, and redirect internal users to the internal IP address after they logged in. They will use the site thru the internet only before they're not logged in, I think, it's acceptable. Don't forget, when redirecting users from example.com to 192.168.1.99, all the cookies will be "lost", the user's session will be cleared, which thing you have to solve it somehow (say, redirect to the local site with a magic parameter, which re-initializes the session on the 192.168.1.99 server).

It has one withdraw: your users listed as internals can't use the site from other place, say, from home. It can be solved by placing to them (and only to them) a direct link after they logs in ("click here if you're not in the office"), which forces the use of the internet site (example.com), or you can solve it by JavaScript (requesting some data with AJAX from 192.168.1.99, and if it fails, don't redirect the user to 192.168.1.99 - maybe it is a bit more difficult).

Edit, suggested by @glglgl: Check client's IP address to see, wheter the request has been initiated from local network or over internet. (See comments.)

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user logs in isn't matter. What I want to do is to make a memorable and prettier way, with ofcourse better access speed. –  Dimas Ahmad Eka Putra Dec 20 '11 at 8:55
    
Then go ahead! Also, hacking the DNS is more easier. –  ern0 Dec 20 '11 at 8:57
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It is not the only way. YOu can distinguish via the source IP address if they are "inside" or "outside". So they could access from home as well. –  glglgl Dec 20 '11 at 8:58
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@glglgl: How true! It's only 10:00 am, I'm too slow yet. –  ern0 Dec 20 '11 at 9:05
    
@glglgl but how? I don't really understand networking, especially with this problem. I'm not undergraduate network thing people. Do you have any references? –  Dimas Ahmad Eka Putra Dec 20 '11 at 9:08

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