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Not quite sure if I asked correctly, but basically I have an array that stores some var(int/numbers). And when I loop through the array changing the numbers of the var, at the end the number seems still unchanged. You would have a better idea of what I'm talking about base on the below code.

private var _numArray:Array = new Array()
    private var _no1:int
    private var _no2:int

    public function Main():void
    {
        _no1 = 10
        _no2 = 20
        _numArray.push(_no1)
        _numArray.push(_no2)

        while (_numArray.length)
        {
            _numArray[0] = 0
            _numArray.splice(0, 1)
        }
        trace(_no1, _no2) // still returning 10 , 20
    }
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want the array to store references instead of values, you'll need to use a non-primitive datatype. Among the primitive datatypes are int, uint, Number, Boolean and String. A non-primitive (complex) datatype is anything else.

// SpecialNumber.as

public class SpecialNumber
{
    public var value:Number;

    public function SpecialNumber(value:Number)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }
}

// Main.as

public class Main
{
    public function Main()
    {
        var no1:SpecialNumber = new SpecialNumber(5);
        var no2:SpecialNumber = new SpecialNumber(10);

        var array:Array = [no1, no2];

        array[0].value += 10;
        array[1].value += 60;

        trace(no1.value, no2.value) // Output is "15 70"
    }
}
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just what I was looking for, though it does consume slightly more memory compare to manually setting the var 1 by 1. But still, its good to know there's an option for changing massive of numbers in 1 go. –  Hwang Dec 20 '11 at 9:34
    
This stores the reference to a value instead of the value itself. This is what it would have to do in order to work as you requested anyway, so it's not really using more memory :) –  Jonatan Hedborg Dec 20 '11 at 20:25
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This is how primitives work. When you push a primitive like int, Number etc. to an array or pass to a function they are passed by value. So _numArray[0] and _no1 are different things. Change is one does not affect another.

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