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I just started programming and tried to write something but (of course) it failed. After I while I got to the real problem: The UnboundLocalError. So to save you from all the rubble around I stripped the code down to this:

def test():
    try:
        i1 = int(i1)
        i2 = int(i2)
    except ValueError:
        print "you failed in typing a number"

def input(): 
    i1 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')
    i2 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')

Then I wrote down:

>>>input()
please insert a number
> 3
please insert a number
> 2 
>>>test()

And then I got:

that was not a number
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 7, in test
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'i1' referenced before assignment

How can I solve this in a Pythonic way? Or should I take a whole different way?

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1  
Think about it this way: Regular variables such as i1 and i2 are local to the function and not visible outside it. Your function input creates local variables that are unknown to test. If you want to access data in test, that data must be global (see the global keyword for global variables) or explicitely given to it using function arguments (see Cédrick Julien's answer). As a rule of thumb, global variables should be avoided if possible. –  Ferdinand Beyer Dec 20 '11 at 9:43
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The most standard way to do this is to give parameters to your test method :

def test(i1, i2):
    try:
        i1 = int(i1)
        i2 = int(i2)
    except ValueError:
        print "you failed in typing a number"

def input(): 
    i1 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')
    i2 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')
    test(i1, i2)   # here we call directly test() with entered "numbers"

If you really want to test on the interactive prompt, you can do (as suggested in @FerdinandBeyer comment) :

def test(i1, i2):
    try:
        i1 = int(i1)
        i2 = int(i2)
    except ValueError:
        print "you failed in typing a number"
    return i1, i2
    
def input(): 
    i1 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')
    i2 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')
    return i1, i2

And then, on prompt :

>>>var1, var2 = input()
please insert a number
> 3
please insert a number
> 2 
>>>test(var1, var2)
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+1. input should return the variables, so that the OP can test his functions in the interactive prompt: i1, i2 = input(); test(i1, i2). –  Ferdinand Beyer Dec 20 '11 at 9:47
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use the keyword "global".

def test():
    global i1
    global i2
    try:
        i1 = int(i1)
        i2 = int(i2)
    except ValueError:
        print "you failed in typing a number"

def input(): 
    global i1
    global i2
    i1 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')
    i2 = raw_input('please type a number \n >')

This causes i1 and i2 to be seen as global variables (accessible over the whole of the program) rather than local variables (only accessible within the function they are defined in - this caused the exception)

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