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While answering another question I bumped into this interesting situation Where WCF is happy to cast an interface with different number of members and from Different namespaces where normal .net runtime can't.

Can any one explain how WCF is able to do it and how to configure/force WCF to behave same as normal .net runtime. Please note that I know I should have only one interface and blah.. blah..

here is working code

using System;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.IO;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.ServiceModel.Channels;
using System.ServiceModel.Description;

namespace MyClient
{
  [ServiceContract]
  public interface IService
  {
    [OperationContract]
    string Method(string dd);
    [OperationContract]
    string Method2(string dd);
  }
}

namespace MyServer
{
  [ServiceContract]
  public interface IService
  {
    [OperationContract]
    string Method(string dd);
  }
}

namespace MySpace
{
  public class Service : MyServer.IService
  {
    public string Method(string dd)
    {
      dd = dd + " String from Server.";
      return dd;
    }
  }

  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      string Url = "http://localhost:8000/";
      Binding binding = new BasicHttpBinding();
      ServiceHost host = new ServiceHost(typeof(Service));
      host.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(MyServer.IService), binding, Url);
      host.AddDefaultEndpoints();
      host.Open();

      // Following line gives error as it should do. 
      //MyClient.IService iservice = (MyClient.IService)new MySpace.Service(); 

      // but WCF is happy to do it ;)
      ChannelFactory<MyClient.IService> fac = new ChannelFactory<MyClient.IService>(binding);
      fac.Open();
      MyClient.IService proxy = fac.CreateChannel(new EndpointAddress(Url));


      string d = proxy.Method("String from client.");
      fac.Close();
      host.Close();
      Console.WriteLine("Result after calling \n " + d);

      Console.ReadLine();


    }
  }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no inconsistency.

      // Following line gives error, as it should do, because the .NET types 
      // MyClient.IService and MySpace.Service are not related.   
      MyClient.IService iservice = (MyClient.IService)new MySpace.Service();   // ERROR !!

      // Likewise, a WCF client proxy defined using MyService.IService as the contract
      // cannot be cast to the unrelated .NET type MyClient.IService
      ChannelFactory<MyService.IService> fac1 = new ChannelFactory<MyService.IService>(binding); 
      fac1.Open(); 
      MyClient.IService proxy = (MyClient.IService)fac1.CreateChannel(new EndpointAddress(Url));  // ERROR !!

      // but the service can be consumed by any WCF client proxy for which the contract 
      // matches the defined service contract (i.e. they both expect the same XML infoset 
      // in the request and response messages). There is no dependency between the .NET type 
      // used in the client code and the .NET type used to implement the service. 
      ChannelFactory<MyClient.IService> fac = new ChannelFactory<MyClient.IService>(binding); 
      fac.Open(); 
      // Next line does not error because the ChannelFactory instance is explicitly 
      // specialised to return a MyClient.IService so the .NET type is the same... there is no cast
      MyClient.IService proxy = fac.CreateChannel(new EndpointAddress(Url)); 
      // NOTE: Thus far we have not done anything with the service in this case.
      // If we call Method() it should succeed, since the contract matches. If we call
      // Method2() the channel will fault as there is no matching operation contract in the service.

The .NET type system is a completely different concept to the WCF notion of service/operation/message/data contract. Just as well, otherwise you could never write a WCF client for a WCF service you didn't write yourself.

However, as the middle example shows, if you reuse the .NET type for the service contract in both service and client code, your expectation will be met.

share|improve this answer
    
Chris, can you explain "// but the service can be consumed by any WCF client proxy for which the contract // matches the defined service contract (i.e. they both expect the same XML infoset // in the request and response messages)." –  Surjit Samra Dec 20 '11 at 19:36
    
How and why the contracts are matching both are having different set of methods ? –  Surjit Samra Dec 20 '11 at 19:37
1  
I should have said "for which the contract matches the defined operation contract". The server stack knows nothing about how the client stack constructed its request message - so doesn't know the client has used an interface containing an extra method to construct its client-side channel runtime. All the service sees is the request infoset for the operation "Method", which is valid under its service contract, so it responds happily. –  Chris Dickson Jun 18 '12 at 9:11

Your MyClient.IService has the same method as MyServer.IService does WCF's channel factory thinks that the contract matches on the exposed url and hence processes the request.

Try changing your MyClient.IService method name and you can see it fail. Namespace are logical seperations as we know.

When you create a WCF Service and expose the wsdl it doesn't have any of your namespaces, unless you specify one in your configuration using bindingNamespace attribute in your endpoint element. Just try a sample and generate a proxy from the wsdl to see that the proxy doesn't have any namespace.

As long as the IService in your MyClient and MyServer namespace match your WCF code above would work

In regards to your code below:

MyClient.IService iservice = (MyClient.IService)new MySpace.Service();       

You are trying to cast MySpace.Service explicitly to MyClient.IService where your "Service" doesnt implement your MyClient.IService and is correct according to OOP. Since you have all the code in a single file and is self hosted might be giving you the confusion.

share|improve this answer
    
Rajesh , I understand your point of namespaces. I still can't get my head around how proxy class is able to cast an interface with one method to an interface with two methods ? –  Surjit Samra Dec 20 '11 at 22:07
    
Where are u casting an interface with one method to an interface of 2 methods? –  Rajesh Dec 21 '11 at 9:27
    
May be too much Remoting and OOPS in my head , If you see I am using MyServer.IService while creating a binding EndPoint and then from client I am asking interface MyClient.IService in my head that should throw exception saying there is no such interface exposed from any endpoint –  Surjit Samra Dec 21 '11 at 22:21
    
As said the endpoint exposed doesnt consider your namespace unless you specify it when creating the endpoint before hosting. In your code you are using MyClient.IService which has a method with the same signature and name as MyServer.IService and hence your code works. –  Rajesh Dec 22 '11 at 9:45

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