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What are the reasons behind the decision to not have a fully generic get method in the interface of java.util.Map<K, V>.

To clarify the question, the signature of the method is

V get(Object key)

instead of

V get(K key)

and I'm wondering why (same thing for remove, containsKey, containsValue).

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Similar question regarding Collection: stackoverflow.com/questions/104799/… –  Alik Elzin - kilaka Sep 4 '12 at 12:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 147 down vote accepted

As mentioned by others, the reason why get(), etc. is not generic because the key of the entry you are retrieving does not have to be the same type as the object that you pass in to get(); the specification of the method only requires that they be equal. This follows from how the equals() method takes in an Object as parameter, not just the same type as the object.

Although it may be commonly true that many classes have equals() defined so that its objects can only be equal to objects of its own class, there are many places in Java where this is not the case. For example, the specification for List.equals() says that two List objects are equal if they are both Lists and have the same contents, even if they are different implementations of List. So coming back to the example in this question, according to the specification of the method is possible to have a Map<ArrayList, Something> and for me to call get() with a LinkedList as argument, and it should retrieve the key which is a list with the same contents. This would not be possible if get() were generic and restricted its argument type.

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7  
Then why is V Get(K k) in C#? –  user166390 Sep 14 '11 at 15:21
52  
The question is, if you want to call m.get(linkedList), why didn't you define m's type as Map<List,Something>? I can't think of a usecase where calling m.get(HappensToBeEqual) without changing the Map type to get an interface makes sense. –  Elazar Leibovich Feb 14 '12 at 12:07
16  
Wow, serious design flaw. You get no compiler warning either, screwed up. I agree with Elazar. If this is really useful, which I doubt happens often, a getByEquals(Object key) sounds more reasonable... –  SecretService Sep 26 '12 at 12:25
3  
So why didn't Java just get rid of types all together? –  Dog May 20 '13 at 13:27
7  
This decision seems like it was made on the basis of theoretical purity rather than practicality. For the majority of usages, developers would much rather see the argument limited by the template type, than to have it unlimited to support edge cases like the one mentioned by newacct in his answer. Leaving the non-templated signatures creates more problems than it solves. –  Sam Goldberg Dec 17 '13 at 18:03

An awesome Java coder at Google, Kevin Bourrillion, wrote about exactly this issue in a blog post a while ago (admittedly in the context of Set instead of Map). The most relevant sentence:

Uniformly, methods of the Java Collections Framework (and the Google Collections Library too) never restrict the types of their parameters except when it's necessary to prevent the collection from getting broken.

I'm not entirely sure I agree with it as a principle - .NET seems to be fine requiring the right key type, for example - but it's worth following the reasoning in the blog post. (Having mentioned .NET, it's worth explaining that part of the reason why it's not a problem in .NET is that there's the bigger problem in .NET of more limited variance...)

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I'm sure Josh Bloch has written about it somewhere. An earlier attempt did use the generic parameter for the parameter, but was found to be too awkward. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 13 '09 at 12:19
3  
Apocalisp: that's not true, the situation is still the same. –  Kevin Bourrillion Nov 4 '09 at 16:24
5  
@user102008 No, the post is not wrong. Even though an Integer and a Double can never be equal to one another, it's still a fair question to ask whether a Set<? extends Number> contains the value new Integer(5). –  Kevin Bourrillion Jun 19 '12 at 15:10
10  
I have never once wanted to check membership in a Set<? extends Foo>. I have very frequently changed the key type of a map and then been frustrated that the compiler could not find all the places where the code needed updating. I am really not convinced that this is the correct tradeoff. –  Porculus Sep 21 '12 at 20:52
1  
@EarthEngine: It's always been broken. That's the whole point - the code is broken, but the compiler can't catch it. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '13 at 6:46

The contract is expressed thus:

More formally, if this map contains a mapping from a key k to a value v such that (key==null ? k==null : key.equals(k)), then this method returns v; otherwise it returns null. (There can be at most one such mapping.)

(my emphasis)

and as such, a successful key lookup depends on the input key's implementation of the equality method. That is not necessarily dependent on the class of k.

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3  
It is also dependent on hashCode(). Without a proper implementation of hashCode(), a nicely implemented equals() is rather useless in this case. –  rudolfson May 13 '09 at 11:51
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I guess, in principle, this would let you use a lightweight proxy for a key, if recreating the whole key was impractical - as long as equals() and hashCode() are correctly implemented. –  Bill Michell May 13 '09 at 12:32
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@rudolfson: As far as I'm aware, only a HashMap is reliant upon the hash code to find the correct bucket. A TreeMap, for example, uses a binary search tree, and doesn't care about hashCode(). –  Rob May 13 '09 at 17:19

It's an application of Postel's Law, "be conservative in what you do, be liberal in what you accept from others."

Equality checks can be performed regardless of type; the equals method is defined on the Object class and accepts any Object as a parameter. So, it makes sense for key equivalence, and operations based on key equivalence, to accept any Object type.

When a map returns key values, it conserves as much type information as it can, by using the type parameter.

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Then why is V Get(K k) in C#? –  user166390 Sep 14 '11 at 15:20
10  
@pst: Because Hejlsberg doesn't take my opinion seriously. –  erickson Sep 14 '11 at 15:45
1  
It's V Get(K k) in C# because it also makes sense. The difference between the Java and .NET approaches is really only who blocks off non-matching stuff. In C# it's the compiler, in Java it's the collection. I rage about .NET's inconsistent collection classes once in a while, but Get() and Remove() only accepting a matching type certainly prevents you from accidentally passing a wrong value in. –  Wormbo May 29 '12 at 11:33
9  
It's a mis-application of Postel's Law. Be liberal in what you accept from others, but not too liberal. This idiotic API means that you can't tell the difference between "not in the collection" and "you made a static typing mistake". Many thousands of lost programmer hours could have been prevented with get : K -> boolean. –  Judge Mental Apr 29 '13 at 23:19
    
Of course that should have been contains : K -> boolean. –  Judge Mental Jun 10 at 15:41

I think this section of Generics Tutorial explains the situation (my emphasis):

"You need to make certain that the generic API is not unduly restrictive; it must continue to support the original contract of the API. Consider again some examples from java.util.Collection. The pre-generic API looks like:

interface Collection { 
  public boolean containsAll(Collection c);
  ...
}

A naive attempt to generify it is:

interface Collection<E> { 
  public boolean containsAll(Collection<E> c);
  ...
}

While this is certainly type safe, it doesn’t live up to the API’s original contract. The containsAll() method works with any kind of incoming collection. It will only succeed if the incoming collection really contains only instances of E, but:

  • The static type of the incoming collection might differ, perhaps because the caller doesn’t know the precise type of the collection being passed in, or perhaps because it is a Collection<S>,where S is a subtype of E.
  • It’s perfectly legitimate to call containsAll() with a collection of a different type. The routine should work, returning false."
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2  
why not containsAll( Collection< ? extends E > c ), then? –  Judge Mental Apr 29 '13 at 23:20
1  
@JudgeMental, though not given as an example above it is also necessary to allow containsAll with a Collection<S> where S is a supertype of E. This would not be allowed if it were containsAll( Collection< ? extends E > c ). Furthermore, as is explicitly stated in the example, it's legitimate to pass a collection of a different type (with the return value then being false). –  davmac Jun 10 at 12:13
    
It should not be necessary to allow containsAll with a collection of a supertype of E. I argue that it is necessary to disallow that call with a static type check to prevent a bug. It's a silly contract, which I think is the point of the original question. –  Judge Mental Jun 10 at 15:51

The reason is that containment is determined by equals and hashCode which are methods on Object and both take an Object parameter. This was an early design flaw in Java's standard libraries. Coupled with limitations in Java's type system, it forces anything that relies on equals and hashCode to take Object. If Object were defined Object<A extends Object>, then you would be able to write generic equals and hashCode, but this would have obvious negative consequences since every class in Java extends Object.

The only way to have type-safe hash tables and equality in Java is to eschew Object.equals and Object.hashCode and use a generic substitute. Functional Java comes with type classes for just this purpose: Hash<A> and Equal<A>. A wrapper for HashMap<K, V> is provided that takes Hash<K> and Equal<K> in its constructor. This class's get and contains methods therefore take a generic argument of type K.

Example:

HashMap<String, Integer> h =
  new HashMap<String, Integer>(Equal.stringEqual, Hash.stringHash);

h.add("one", 1);

h.get("one"); // All good

h.get(Integer.valueOf(1)); // Compiler error
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2  
This in itself does not prevent the type of 'get' from being declared as "V get(K key)", because 'Object' is always an ancestor of K, so "key.hashCode()" would still be valid. –  finnw Sep 21 '09 at 18:44
1  
While it doesn't prevent it, I think it explains it. If they switched the equals method to force class equality, they certainly couldn't tell people that the underlying mechanism for locating the object in the map utilizes equals() and hashmap() when the method prototypes for those methods aren't compatible. –  altCognito Jul 12 '12 at 15:02

There is one more weighty reason, it can not be done technically, because it brokes Map.

Java has polymorphic generic construction like <? extends SomeClass>. Marked such reference can point to type signed with <AnySubclassOfSomeClass>. But polymorphic generic makes that reference readonly. Compiller allows you use generic type only as returning type of method (like simle getters), but blocks using of methods where generic type is argument (like ordinary setters). It means if you write Map<? extends KeyType, ValueType>, compiller not allow you call method get(<? extens KeyType>), and map will be useless. The only solution is to make this method not generic: get(Object).

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why is the set method strongly typed then? –  Sentenza May 24 at 17:19
    
if you mean 'put': The put() method changes map and it will not be avaliable with generics like <? extends SomeClass>. If you call it you got compile exception. Such map will be "readonly" –  Owheee Jun 17 at 13:57

Backwards compatibility, I guess. Map (or HashMap) still needs to support get(Object).

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11  
But the same argument could be made for put (which does restrict the generic types). You get backwards compatibility by using raw types. Generics are "opt-in". –  Thilo Sep 1 '11 at 10:02

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