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When we write int a;, it doesn't mean that we are creating an object of class int.

  1. What does it mean?
  2. What is the type of the datatype int in C and C++?
  3. Which header file shows what it is?
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5  
But int a; does indeed create an object in C++. It's an object of type int with indeterminate value if it has automatic storage duration; or with value 0, if it has static storage duration. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 20 '11 at 11:22
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@AnishaKaul: That comment is wrong (as explained in the 7th comment there). In C++, an "object" is any region of storage. –  Mike Seymour Dec 20 '11 at 11:34
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@BasileStarynkevitch Plain old data are objects, just as much as class types are objects. The definition int a; creates an object of type int. –  James Kanze Dec 20 '11 at 11:34
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@AnishaKaul, refer to the standard 3.9-8, an object-type is basically any type excluding references and functions. The primitives are called "arithmetic types", but is a subset of object type. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Dec 20 '11 at 11:35
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@Cody: there's a big difference between C and C++, but as it happens the answer to this particular question is the same in both (different standards citations, but to the same result). Is it really necessary to ask two questions? –  Steve Jessop Dec 20 '11 at 11:44
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5 Answers

When we write int a;, it doesn't mean that we are creating an object of class int.

int a; does indeed create an object in C++. It's an object of type int with indeterminate value if it has automatic storage duration; or with value 0, if it has static storage duration. But there is no "class int" because int is not a class type.

int is a:

  • integral type;
  • signed type;
  • arithmetic type;
  • fundamental type;
  • scalar type;
  • standard layout type;
  • trivially copyable type;
  • POD type;
  • trivial type;

Seems like you got a bit confused in your previous question :)

In int x = 12;, you are creating an object of type int that is named x and has value 12.

The idea of object in C++ is not the same as in most other languages, and most certainly is not the same as is commonly used in object-oriented programming circles. An object in C++ is a region of storage.

If something has a type, it's either an object, a reference, or a function.

Which header file shows what it is?

The language simply requires that the type int has to exist and have certain characteristics (like being integral and having a sign). All compilers I know of simply treat all the builtin types specially and that's why you won't find a definition for them in the standard library headers. In fact, they can't provide a definition for them in any header using C++, because the language doesn't provide any means of defining fundamental types. They could only either:

  • define it as a compound type (which would be wrong); or
  • define it using compiler-specific extensions.

The builtin types are effectively magic.

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@thecoshman: The notion of an object is formally defined in the C++-standard. –  Björn Pollex Dec 20 '11 at 11:42
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It's also a standard layout type, trivially copyable type, POD type, and trivial type :) –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Dec 20 '11 at 11:47
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@Anisha: int is the type. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 21 '11 at 4:06
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@Anisha: it's a builtin type. Compilers treat it specially without having a definition anywhere. It cannot be a class though. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 21 '11 at 4:16
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In the latest C++ standard this is described in sections §3.9.1 and §3.9.2. These make the distinction between fundamental and compound types (classes, arrays, etc). int is a fundamental type, and thus cannot be a class. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 21 '11 at 4:34
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The int type is built-in inside the language and the compiler. On most implementations, it is some kind of machine word (fitting into the processor's registers), as efficiently handled by the processor. On my (Debian/Linux/AMD64) system, it is a 32 bits word, usually aligned to 4 bytes.

There is no header defining it. The compiler has an intimate knowledge about int. And it is not a class or some aggregate type, it is atomic in the sense of not being composed of smaller stuff.

All languages I know have predefined or built-in types (or names), which are specially known to the compiler. For example, in Ocaml, the Pervasives module is built-in.

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What does word mean here? –  TheIndependentAquarius Dec 21 '11 at 3:51
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I added a link to explain machine words –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 21 '11 at 5:57
    
"... On most implementations, it is some kind of machine word" - not true at all for all 64-bit Linux's, where long is the machine word. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Dec 21 '11 at 9:51
    
The definition of word on x86-64 is depending of the context. But I did add "fitting into a register" and a 32 bits int fit into a 32 bits [sub-] register like EAX (not RAX) on AMD64 –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 21 '11 at 9:55
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(as far as C is concerned)

int is a primitive type, to the extend that it is a language keyword. No header of any sort declares it.

However, there are a lot of typedefs defined in headers which do use primitive types as "backends" and which do require that you include the relevant headers (i.e uint32_t, uint16_t, etc etc).

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When you type "int a;", you let the compiler know that any symbols "a" in a's scope have the datatype "int".

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int is a built-in type, no header file defines it. What int a; means depends on where this line of code is located.

It can be

  • local variable
  • object field
  • global variable

Note that int a; is not a good way to define local variable. you should always initialize it, there are several ways to do so:


int a = 5; //value is 5
int a = int(); //default constructor, value is 0
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'int a();' does not default construct and int sadly. You want 'int a=int();' Lookup "most vexing parse" –  Mooing Duck Dec 21 '11 at 7:22
    
@Mooing Duck, fixed, thanks. –  imaximchuk Dec 21 '11 at 13:36
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