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Consider the following snippet:

>k<-5
>T<-t(combn(k+1,k))
>T
   [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    1    2    3    4    6
[3,]    1    2    3    5    6
[4,]    1    2    4    5    6
[5,]    1    3    4    5    6
[6,]    2    3    4    5    6

Except for the first line, each line T[i,] of T has k elements, k-1 of which are common with T[i-1,].

I want to re-order the entries in a given line of T[i,], i>1 such that the 'new' entry on each line is placed in the last column.

i.e I want the re-ordered table to look like:

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    1    2    3    4    6
[3,]    1    2    3    6    5
[4,]    1    2    6    5    4
[5,]    1    6    4    5    3
[6,]    6    3    4    5    2

How would you go about it?

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ok, how do we migrate a question (without cross-posting)? –  user189035 Dec 20 '11 at 10:16
    
ok Seb:> flagged for modo attention. Let's see. Thanks. –  user189035 Dec 20 '11 at 10:27
    
Also consider changing the title of your question to something more descriptive. –  Paul Hiemstra Dec 20 '11 at 10:45
    
sorry, i was reading it on stats and now i'm reading it here but i still don't get it. what do you mean with 'new' entry in each column? –  Seb Dec 20 '11 at 11:53
    
@Seb:> Set i to 2. look at row i: it has k-1 element in common with row i-1, the 'new' entry is 6 (because you don't see 6 appearing in row i-1 but it appears in row i). Then I want 6 to be moved to the last column of row i. same for i in 2:(k+1). Does it help? –  user189035 Dec 20 '11 at 12:05
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migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Dec 20 '11 at 11:40

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

NEVER EVER call a variable T. Yes, it's a valid name. Yes, all code should use TRUE for the boolean value, but there are enough pieces of code where they actually use T for TRUE. You'll break those.

You can use the following function :

new.order <- function(x){
    comp <- function(a,b){
        id <- which(match(a,b,0L)==0)
        if(id!=nc){
          b[nc] <- b[id]
          b[id] <- a[nc]
        }
        b
    }
    nr <- nrow(x)
    nc <- ncol(x)
    xlist <- lapply(seq_len(nr),function(i) x[i,])
    out <- mapply(comp,xlist[-nr],xlist[-1],SIMPLIFY=FALSE)
    do.call(rbind,c(xlist[1],out))
}

The internal function comp will replace the changed element if necessary. The main function uses lapply to make your matrix a list rowwise, and then mapply to do the matching over all rows. Last (but not least), you rbind everything together.

This gives

> k<-5

> myT<-t(combn(k+1,k))

> myT
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    1    2    3    4    6
[3,]    1    2    3    5    6
[4,]    1    2    4    5    6
[5,]    1    3    4    5    6
[6,]    2    3    4    5    6

> new.order(myT)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    1    2    3    4    6
[3,]    1    2    3    6    5
[4,]    1    2    6    5    4
[5,]    1    6    4    5    3
[6,]    6    3    4    5    2

Which seems the desired result.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice. –  user189035 Dec 20 '11 at 13:58
1  
@user189035 I missed one line in the output, corrected it now –  Joris Meys Dec 20 '11 at 14:05
    
I think you can speed up your code quite a bit if you replace the comp function with something like: r2<-r2[c(which(match(r1,r2,0)!=0),which(match(r1,r2,0)==0))] –  Carl Witthoft Dec 20 '11 at 15:32
    
@CarlWitthoft Did you actually try that? that's two calls (one to which, one to match) to replace one if-statement. On small matrices, time difference is virtually nonexistent. On large matrices, the extra match and which call is costing you, and my solution is about twice as fast as yours. –  Joris Meys Dec 20 '11 at 16:03
2  
@CarlWitthoft You have more chance optimizing this by avoiding the conversion to list and back to matrix, but it's less easy to generalize and requires quite some index magic.Try calling match() on two matrices and work with the resulting matrix as a vector. With some smart use of index patterns you should be able speed this up. I'm leaving it as an exercise to the reader :) –  Joris Meys Dec 20 '11 at 20:39
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Use the KISS rule: For this example, I've simply used r1,r2,r3 instead of T[i,], "old" T[i+1,], "new"T[i+1,] .

Rgames: r1<-c(1,2,6,4,3) 

Rgames: r2<-c(1,2,5,4,3) 

Rgames: r3<-c(intersect(r1,r2),setdiff(r2,r1))
Rgames: r3 
[1] 1 2 4 3 5 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning intersect and setdiff. I tend to cut out double code as much as possible for performance reasons. Hence my use of match. –  Joris Meys Dec 20 '11 at 14:09
    
+1 same reason. –  user189035 Dec 20 '11 at 15:14
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May this help:

 for(i in 1:ncol(T)) T[i+1, (nrow(T)-i):ncol(T)] = nrow(T):(nrow(T)-i+1) 

T=
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    1    2    3    4    6
[3,]    1    2    3    6    5
[4,]    1    2    6    5    4
[5,]    1    6    5    4    3
[6,]    6    5    4    3    2

However, I do not understand the logic of second output of T. Why the 5th line is

T[5, ] = 1 6 4 5 3 

and not

T[5, ] = 1 6 5 4 3 

Why the 5 and 4 are inverted their order?

share|improve this answer
    
concerning your question: the 'new' element in the 5th line is 3 (3 does not appear in the 4th line). So i want the last column of the 5th line of the re-ordered matrix T' to be 3. The other entries should be left as they are in T (except for the occupant of the last column of the 5th line which should be moved where the 3 was). Does that respond to your question? –  user189035 Dec 20 '11 at 12:54
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Basically find the column index that identifies the "new" element when comparing to the row above and swap it with the 5.

 for (row.idx in 2:6){ T[row.idx, c(which(!T[row.idx,] %in% T[row.idx-1,]), 5)] <- 
                             T[row.idx, c(5, which(!T[row.idx,] %in% T[row.idx-1,]) )] }
 T
 rm(T) # not a good idea to have that lying around your workspace
       # ... even if you don't use T for TRUE
#
#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    1    2    3    4    6
[3,]    1    2    3    6    5
[4,]    1    2    6    5    4
[5,]    1    6    4    5    3
[6,]    6    3    4    5    2
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